A PR Surprise for Managers

Comments (20)


A PR Surprise for Managers

By: Robert A. Kelly

For those business, non-profit and association managers committed to PR tactics like radio and newspaper plugs, it can come as a surprise to discover where public relations value REALLY lies.

Truth is, your PR budget can deliver results far beyond such limited publicity placements.

For example by embracing the kind of PR plan that persuades those important outside audiences to your way of thinking, and moving them to take actions that help your department, division or subsidiary succeed.

Then by using the high-impact, fundamental premise of public relations to deliver external stakeholder behavior change the kind that leads directly to achieving your managerial objectives.

And finally by revving up the creative potential of your assigned PR team or agency and involving them in a way that positively impacts the behaviors of the very outside audiences that MOST affect your unit.

Perhaps then you will find yourself with a basketful of results such as prospects starting to do business with you; community leaders beginning to seek you out; newly arrived proposals for strategic alliances and joint ventures; customers starting to make repeat purchases; membership applications on the rise; politicians and legislators beginning to think of you as a key member of the business, non-profit or association communities; welcome bounces in show room visits; and even capital givers or specifying sources starting to look your way.

Spend a moment here and read that fundamental public relations blueprint referred to above: People act on their own perception of the facts before them, which leads to predictable behaviors about which something can be done. When we create, change or reinforce that opinion by reaching, persuading and moving-to-desired-action the very people whose behaviors affect the organization the most, the public relations mission is accomplished.

This lets you broaden your public relations field of fire, putting its primary focus where it belongs, on your units key external stakeholder behaviors.

A caveat here: be sure that the public relations personnel assigned to your unit really believe deep down -- why its SO important to know how your most important outside audiences perceive your operations, products or services. Be certain they accept the reality that perceptions almost always lead to behaviors that can help or hurt your unit.

Review with them your blueprint for monitoring and gathering perceptions by questioning members of your most important outside audiences. Questions like these: How much do you know about our services or products and employees? How much do you know about our chief executive? Have you had prior contact with us and were you pleased with the interchange? Have you experienced problems with our people or procedures?

When you think of it, youre fortunate that your PR folks already are in the perception and behavior business so they can jump right on the perception monitoring assignment. If your budget can handle it, you can always use a professional survey firm, but they can be very expensive. Nevertheless, whether its your people or a survey firm asking the questions, your objective is to identify untruths if not outright lies, false assumptions, unfounded rumors, inaccuracies, and misconceptions .

Now you must carefully select which of the above aberrations qualifies as your corrective public relations goal for example, clarify the misconception, spike that rumor, correct the false assumption or fix certain other inaccuracies.

Now, if you pick the wrong strategy to show you how to reach your goal, it will feel like youre eating Roast Turkey without the stuffing. Fact is, you can only achieve your PR goal by picking the right strategy from the three choices available to you, change existing perception, create perception where there may be none, or reinforce it. And take care that your new strategy is a natural fit with that new public relations goal.

Sooner or later you will have to address your key stakeholder audience in a way that will help persuade them to your way of thinking. So assign the task to your very best writer because s/he must put together some very special, corrective language. Words, by the way, that are not only compelling, persuasive and believable, but clear and factual if they are to shift perception/opinion towards your point of view and lead to the behaviors you have targeted.

Here you take an easy step select the communications tactics needed to carry your message to the attention of your target audience. Checking, of course, that the tactics you select are known to reach folks like your audience members. Dozens are available from speeches, facility tours, emails and brochures to consumer briefings, media interviews, newsletters, personal meetings and many others.

Because HOW one communicates often affects the believability of the message, you may wish to deliver it in smaller meetings or presentations rather than high-profile media such as a news release..

Questions will arise as to indications of progress. That will be your signal to schedule a second perception monitoring session with members of your external audience. You will use many of the same questions as in the first benchmark session. But you will now be watching carefully for signs that the offending perception is actually moving in your direction.

A fortunate reality in the public relations business is that these matters usually can be accelerated by adding more communications tactics as well as increasing their frequencies.

Yes, as a manager, it may surprise you that a workable public relations blueprint like this one will help you persuade your most important outside stakeholders to your way of thinking, then move them to behave in a way that leads to the success of your department, division or subsidiary.

But its no surprise that the people you deal with behave like everyone else they act upon their perceptions of the facts they hear about you and your operation. Leaving you little choice but to deal promptly and effectively with those perceptions by doing what is necessary to reach and move those key external audiences to action.

end

Please feel free to publish this article and resource box in your ezine, newsletter, offline publication or website. A copy would be appreciated at bobkelly@TNI.net. Word count is 1110 including guidelines and resource box. Robert A. Kelly 2004.)

About The Author

Bob Kelly counsels, writes and speaks to business, non-profit and association managers about using the fundamental premise of public relations to achieve their operating objectives. He has been DPR, Pepsi-Cola Co.; AGM-PR, Texaco Inc.; VP-PR, Olin Corp.; VP-PR, Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; director of communi- cations, U.S. Department of the Interior, and deputy assistant press secretary, The White House. He holds a bachelor of science degree from Columbia University, major in public relations. bobkelly@TNI.net. Visit: http://www.prcommentary.com

Comments

Tammy C 23.07.2008. 02:23

How do I organize a pet show to benefit the local animal shelter? Our town tried to organize a pet show with only ribbons as prizes and no publicity or sponsors. It was a flop. I would like to help next year and do a better job. It needs sponsors and prizes and advertising. Help?

Tammy C

Admin 23.07.2008. 02:23

For years I volunteered for a charity that held a silent auction followed by dinner, then a live auction.

This is a great cause! The first thing I suggest you look into is http://www.jooners.com/ - a free web app that is great for coordinating all kinds of things. They even have an event category.

Here, the animal shelter is a pet project of the city. I'm not sure if you are in a familiar situation. I would find the person in charge of coordinating events for the city (here it would be the community relations board) and ask if they could provide any assistance. I would go with some suggestions in my pocket, but wouldn't bring them up until I got their input. Sometimes when you make specific requests, you may get them answered and no more. If you leave it open ended, you will be surprised just how many ideas they will come up with that you had not thought of. Then contact them later with your pocket requests if you want. Also think of arenas, civic centers, and other locations in your area where events are often held. The Parks & Rec Department? Get in touch with the Coordinators there and ask the same open ended question.

Does the shelter have contacts with Rescues? See if you can contact them and ask for their suggestions.

Contact the community relations officers at the largest employers in your area and large chain stores. They are use to requests from charities and usually have specific procedures in place to make offers or to determine if your cause is eligible for assistance. Ask to speak directly to the manager.

Contact other volunteers of the animal shelter and ask if they know any companies that would be willing to contribute in any way. Make sure that when you get other people involved that you know who they are going to ask before they ask. Otherwise, you will have duplicate people going to the same sources.

Contact local restaurants. Contact local printers - they may agree to donating or low cost printing of fliers, banners, or the like.

Contact the local newspapers - they often have someone who will work with service organizations on PR possibilities for free or almost free.

That is all I can think of off of the top of my head. I think if you contact these people you will be truly surprised at just how many prize donations and how much PR assistance you will receive. And if you end up with too many prizes or prizes that do not make sense for use to participants, have door prizes and use that as PR to increase spectator attendance.

Oh, and if you want to have a step in for the following year, recruit volunteers to hand write thank you cards to everyone who gave assistance.

I hope this helps.

- Laurel Plum
http://laurelplumonline.com

Admin

Jonathan S 09.10.2008. 23:28

How to organize a fund raising event for a charity? I am trying to organize a fund raising event for a charity. I have never done anything like this before, and don't know were to begin. Where do I start? Are there any good resources to help me out? Thanks in advance.

Jonathan S

Admin 09.10.2008. 23:28

I have answered a similar question twice before. Here is the answer I gave to the last request for someone wanting to hold a benefit concert:

I would start by determining what talent you intend to showcase. If you use local talent, it may just be a matter of getting in touch with them to see if they would be willing to offer their services for the cause and publicity. If you intend to use bigger talent, you will probably need to get in touch with their managing agency (i.e. William Morris Agency). Even for charity, there will be contracts and legalities (and possibly monies) to take care of, and more than likely, they will require you to provide the equipment. Make sure you can get the equipment requested. I would not do anything else until I get the overall details worked out with the talent.

The remainder is an answer I left last week for someone who was wanting to host a benefit for the local animal shelter. Some of the suggestions may also help you.

This is a great cause! The first thing I suggest you look into is http://www.jooners.com/ - a free web app that is great for coordinating all kinds of things. They even have an event category.

Here, the animal shelter is a pet project of the city. I'm not sure if you are in a familiar situation. I would find the person in charge of coordinating events for the city (here it would be the community relations board) and ask if they could provide any assistance. I would go with some suggestions in my pocket, but wouldn't bring them up until I got their input. Sometimes when you make specific requests, you may get them answered and no more. If you leave it open ended, you will be surprised just how many ideas they will come up with that you had not thought of. Then contact them later with your pocket requests if you want. Also think of arenas, civic centers, and other locations in your area where events are often held. The Parks & Rec Department? Get in touch with the Coordinators there and ask the same open ended question.

Does the shelter have contacts with Rescues? See if you can contact them and ask for their suggestions.

Contact the community relations officers at the largest employers in your area and large chain stores. They are use to requests from charities and usually have specific procedures in place to make offers or to determine if your cause is eligible for assistance. Ask to speak directly to the manager.

Contact other volunteers of the animal shelter and ask if they know any companies that would be willing to contribute in any way. Make sure that when you get other people involved that you know who they are going to ask before they ask. Otherwise, you will have duplicate people going to the same sources.

Contact local restaurants. Contact local printers - they may agree to donating or low cost printing of fliers, banners, or the like.

Contact the local newspapers - they often have someone who will work with service organizations on PR possibilities for free or almost free.

That is all I can think of off of the top of my head. I think if you contact these people you will be truly surprised at just how many prize donations and how much PR assistance you will receive. And if you end up with too many prizes or prizes that do not make sense for use to participants, have door prizes and use that as PR to increase spectator attendance.

Oh, and if you want to have a step in for the following year, recruit volunteers to hand write thank you cards to everyone who gave assistance.


I hope this helps.
- Laurel Plum
http://laurelplumonline.com

Admin

ashleybluez 29.07.2008. 02:27

How do you organize a benefit concert? I want to organize a benefit concert for the ASPCA but I don't know how to start.

ashleybluez

Admin 29.07.2008. 02:27

I would start by determining what talent you intend to showcase. If you use local talent, it may just be a matter of getting in touch with them to see if they would be willing to offer their services for the cause and publicity. If you intend to use bigger talent, you will probably need to get in touch with their managing agency (i.e. William Morris Agency). Even for charity, there will be contracts and legalities (and possibly monies) to take care of, and more than likely, they will require you to provide the equipment. Make sure you can get the equipment requested. I would not do anything else until I get the overall details worked out with the talent.

The remainder is an answer I left last week for someone who was wanting to host a benefit for the local animal shelter. Some of the suggestions may also help you.

This is a great cause! The first thing I suggest you look into is http://www.jooners.com/ - a free web app that is great for coordinating all kinds of things. They even have an event category.

Here, the animal shelter is a pet project of the city. I'm not sure if you are in a familiar situation. I would find the person in charge of coordinating events for the city (here it would be the community relations board) and ask if they could provide any assistance. I would go with some suggestions in my pocket, but wouldn't bring them up until I got their input. Sometimes when you make specific requests, you may get them answered and no more. If you leave it open ended, you will be surprised just how many ideas they will come up with that you had not thought of. Then contact them later with your pocket requests if you want. Also think of arenas, civic centers, and other locations in your area where events are often held. The Parks & Rec Department? Get in touch with the Coordinators there and ask the same open ended question.

Does the shelter have contacts with Rescues? See if you can contact them and ask for their suggestions.

Contact the community relations officers at the largest employers in your area and large chain stores. They are use to requests from charities and usually have specific procedures in place to make offers or to determine if your cause is eligible for assistance. Ask to speak directly to the manager.

Contact other volunteers of the animal shelter and ask if they know any companies that would be willing to contribute in any way. Make sure that when you get other people involved that you know who they are going to ask before they ask. Otherwise, you will have duplicate people going to the same sources.

Contact local restaurants. Contact local printers - they may agree to donating or low cost printing of fliers, banners, or the like.

Contact the local newspapers - they often have someone who will work with service organizations on PR possibilities for free or almost free.

That is all I can think of off of the top of my head. I think if you contact these people you will be truly surprised at just how many prize donations and how much PR assistance you will receive. And if you end up with too many prizes or prizes that do not make sense for use to participants, have door prizes and use that as PR to increase spectator attendance.

Oh, and if you want to have a step in for the following year, recruit volunteers to hand write thank you cards to everyone who gave assistance.


I hope this helps.
- Laurel Plum
http://laurelplumonline.com

Admin

nunegro85 05.02.2007. 05:49

How to acquire a client in the marketing field? I'm trying to acquire a client and I'm not sure, how and what way should i go about this? I researched the company and now i'm at the next phase on communication...What should be the next step after this?.Just figuring out how should i start the beginning stages to approach this?
prospective client...
Image Consultant Marketing Field

nunegro85

Admin 05.02.2007. 05:49

what product or service are you offering? This question is very confusing. Maybe you should consider hiring a professional salesman who knows about prospecting and qualifying customers.
UPDATE: For image consulting you would prefer to start with the PR deparment. This can be dangerous though because they may perceive you as a threat to their corner of the company. It will be much easier if the company has suffered a recent public image problem. If they have, and it is a big problem then you could consider going above the PR department to the vice president over the PR department or his boss. If he or she is unhappy with the way the problem has been addressed, you could very easily get an appointment to discuss what you can do to improve their image.

This is a difficult question to answer without knowing much more about the situation you, and the target customer, are in. Having said that, I will provide some tips on how to improve your chances of getting an appointment.

The easiest way to obtain a sales call appointment is through networking. If you know someone who works for the company they could assist with getting you an appointment. If not, how about your current customers? If you have contacts with other business leaders in the community, and they are happy with the work you have done for them, you could contact them and ask if they know anyone in a position to help. You will be surprised how many business people in completely unrelated fields, know each other.

If networking is not an option, you just need to reveryt to the salesmans best friend, cold calling. Start at the top and work your way down. It may take multiple calls and visits to finally get an appointment, but it can pay off if you are persistent. I closed a $170,000 sale last month to a client I had called on for the last 6 months, with no luck. Anytime I had free time, I would call, email or stop by their offices. I finally got lucky and obtained an appointment with a mid level manager then worked my way up the ladder to the VP who made the purchase. It took forever, but it was worth it.

Good luck to you and don't give up. If you have a superior service that will be truly beneficial to them, It will pay off.

Admin

janet 02.06.2007. 12:39

Is the main purpose of the Find Madeleine fund to pay for the support team around the parents? The campaign fund stands at nearly 600,000. Its purpose is to secure the safe return of Madeleine, it can also be used to support the McCann family. Originally donations were sought for sniffer dogs to be taken to Portugal, then for private investigators. Next, a legal team was flown out to advise on the setting up of the campaign fund and to 'liaise'. This team has nothing to do with the investigation in the child's disappearance.

Nothing much wrong with any of this. BUT , as far as I know, the legal team are still there, along with others including members of the McCann extended family, who are devoting themselves to this campaign full time. Legal teams don't come cheap. So my point is, is most of the money being used to protect the McCann parents rather than do anything to find their child? Is one of their jobs to comb through forums and report on adverse publicity - perhaps threatening legal action?
nicola h. I've read that the Warner Holiday village is not charging them for their extended stay - don't know if this applies to the aunts and uncles and others in the team though. Also they are both of fully paid leave from their jobs - he is full time and Mrs McCann part-time and as doctors that must add up to enough to keep things ticking over. They have the use of a private jet and other transport paid for too.

I certainly don't think they should have to worry about money at a time like this and they need some support, but a legal team? and one of them a QC?
Teh Beauty Spot: Warner are paying for them to stay at the complex. They are on full pay from their jobs. private jet and cars provided and it seems accommodation etc for trip to Rome was provided. I'm sure they will have some personal expenses and the publicity etc will cost money but I think the expenses of keeping a legal team must be huge.

Anyway, I'm sure it will all have to be accounted for , then we'll know.

janet

Admin 02.06.2007. 12:39

You're speculating about them being on full-time pay for six months because this is the NHS norm. But I get the impression that the McCanns are settling permanently in Portugal, which would mean this is not just a leave of absence but a retirement.

Also, I imagine the goodwill is running out. If I was Mark Warner I would not let the McCanns stay for free indefinitely (just for them they have two apartments; one to live in and another is being used as an office for fan mail, donations and Team McCann Portugal branch meetings). However, Mark Warner has said that they will let the McCanns and their family members not only stay at the resort for free "for as long as they need to", they're also paying for all their flights back and forth.

It is generally agreed that at least one member of the McCann family has quit his job to be a full-time campaign manager (Gerry's brother). So it would not surprise me if other McCann family members were on the payroll.

Other than that, they have in their employ two solicitors, one barrister, the PR firm Bell Pottinger, two "trauma consultantS" and a firm of accountants. Someone from the Foreign Office who devotes themselves to the McCanns full-time is there, courtesy of the British taxpayer, as are two "Crackers", 3 officers of the Leicestershire police.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=454949&in_page_id=1770

Although I'm pretty sure they've got someone in their employ trying to counter negative publicity, so far I have seen no evidence of them mounting legal actions against people who post on internet forums/message boards. It would be impossible for them to take civil actions against the anti-McCann camp for several reasons, the primary reason being most of it is speculation and not outright defamation.

Admin

gel 27.10.2006. 04:31

What are the science careers that have the highest annual income? Array

gel

Admin 27.10.2006. 04:31

Doctors, pilots and lawyers deliver essential services, often at strange hours and under high stress.

And they're paid well for their effort.

Doctors earn more than anyone else in the private sector, averaging $145,688 a year, according to a Bizjournals.com analysis of data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.




Airplane pilots and navigators rank second at $128,406, followed by lawyers at $118,004. The numbers are for 2004, the latest year available.

Seven occupations made the six-figure list of salaries. Joining doctor, pilots and lawyers are: optometrists, with an annual average of $116,403; medical-science professors, $115,786; marketing and advertising managers, $103,883; and law professors, $103,283.

The bureau estimated wages and hours for hundreds of jobs, based on a survey of employers in the private and public sectors. Bizjournals.com narrowed the focus to full-time workers on the private side and removed statistics for part-time employees and government workers. The pay for 401 occupations begins here.

The Bizjournals.com study shows the connection between salary and education. Seven of the top 10 jobs require postgraduate degrees, while two call for bachelor's degrees. Airlines generally prefer that pilots be college grads, though they don't insist upon it, but the do require the rigorous commercial pilot's license. Descriptions of the 10 highest-paying jobs are here.

The typical private-sector worker earned $37,715 in 2004. Waiters and waitresses, the lowest-paying occupation, earned $8,751 per year. That figure does not include tips, which were not covered by the Bureau of Labor Statistics survey. Here are the 10 lowest-paying occupations.

It's no surprise that professional, technical and managerial jobs dominate the upper end of the private-sector rankings. White-collar jobs paid an average of $46,744 in 2004, far ahead of the blue-collar average of $32,618.

The top 59 occupations in the salary standings are classified as white collar. The highest-paying blue collar job is oil well drillers, who rank 60th overall and earn $62,409 per year. The highest-paying blue-collar occupations are here.

The study found no link between annual wages and hours. Employees at nine of the 10 lowest-paying jobs averaged more than 1,900 hours at work in 2004. But four of the 10 highest-paying jobs fell below the 1,900-hour threshold, with airline pilots averaging just 1,083.

Physicians yield first place in the rankings when salaries and hours are combined. Pilots soar to the top with average earnings of $118.58 per hour. Then come doctors ($66.58) and law professors ($66.55 per hour).


10 Highest Paying Jobs in the Private Sector

Physicians
Airplane pilots and navigators
Lawyers
Optometrists
Med. science teachers
Marketing, ad and PR managers
Law teachers
Physics teachers
Health spec. teachers
Securities, finance services sales

Admin

psilohead 02.07.2006. 16:31

What is the world record for fastest human typist? Array

psilohead

Admin 02.07.2006. 16:31

Barbara Blackburn, the World's Fastest Typist

Typing, Fastest. Mrs. Barbara Blackburn of Salem, Oregon can maintain 150 wpm for 50 min (37,500 key strokes) and attains a speed of 170 wpm using the Dvorak Simplified Keyboard (DSK) system. Her top speed was recorded at 212 wpm. Source: Norris McWhirter, ed. (1985), THE GUINNESS BOOK OF WORLD RECORDS, 23rd US edition, New York: Sterling Publishing Co., Inc.

How does she type so fast? The key, so to speak, is in the keyboard design. Blackburn will type on nothing but the Dvorak keyboard, which has vowels on one side and consonants on the other, with the most frequently used letters on the center row. "It makes much more sense than the standard, so-called Qwerty keyboard (named after the first six letters on the top row)," Blackburn said. In fact, it was the Qwerty keyboard that was her undoing in high school typing class back in Pleasant Hill, Missouri.

"Typing was the bane of my existence." She remembered how her I-minus (I for Inferior) typing grade kept her from graduating at the top of her class. As it was, she graduated third in a class of 46 students. In 1938, as a freshman in business college, Blackburn first laid hands on a Dvorak keyboard. She took to it like a fish to water. In only a few years her speed was up to 138 words per minute.

Blackburn had been such a whiz in her other high school classes, it was no surprise that she would attempt to better her record as a typist, given a chance. The Dvorak keyboard was what gave her the chance. When a representative of the Royal Typewriter Co. came to her business college looking for someone to train as a demonstrator of the Dvorak keyboard, she decided to give it a try.

In no time at all she was as good a typist as she was a bookkeeper and stenographer. She had won statewide contests in the latter two fields as a high school student, but the woman who taught all three courses at Pleasant Hill "was ashamed to admit I was in her typing class," Blackburn remembered.

Carrying her own Dvorak typewriter with her wherever she worked after graduation from business college, Blackburn's extraordinary talents paved her way. From 1939 to 1945 she worked as a legal secretary, and when she decided she needed a change of pace and left the law firm, "I left with the reputation as the best legal secretary in Kansas City," she proudly recalled.

Suddenly there was a mad scramble of executives trying to nab her for their personal secretary.

Blackburn next worked at an electronics company, first as office manager and then as a sales engineer. She did speed typing demonstrations at the Canadian National Exposition and the Canadian Educational Conference. It was then that she was clocked for the the Guinness Book of World Records, in which she was listed for a decade as the world's fastest typist (the category has since been removed). Blackburn went to work at State Farm Insurance in Salem, where she is still employed in the word processing department.

Also, she starred in a television commercial for Apple Computers, which offered a switchable Dvorak-Qwerty keyboard with its Apple IIc model. When she was in New York to tape the commercial, she appeared on the David Letterman Show. But Letterman made a comedy routine out of what she thought was to be a serious demonstration of her typing speed, and Blackburn felt hurt by the experience. In her own words:

"The show aired on Thursday night, after I had returned back to Salem. They had taken my PR photo and blown it up to gigantic size) with the typewriter sitting on a stand (covered with a Plexiglas cover) in front of me and a little to the side with three men seated at a table with a big copy of my Thursday night paper sitting on an easel at the side. My photo took up the entire area behind the men. Letterman was standing beside the typewriter - his opening remark was "No doubt Ms. Blackburn is a very nice lady, but she has to be the biggest fraud and con artist in the world." That he is still running it about every year completely astounds me! I have a complete tape of all of my TV appearances during my publicity reign, but I REFUSE TO WATCH THE LETTERMAN FIASCO."

In the intervening years, Letterman's comedy style has become better-understood and we've grown more accustomed to it. Nevertheless, anyone who has seen her whizzing fingers in action, as well as the flawless results on paper (her error frequency is two-tenths of one percent), can have no doubt that Barbara Blackburn is indeed the world's fastest typist.

Admin

x 22.08.2007. 18:54

Would starting a publishing house be a good idea for a small business? how do I go about starting it? I can write well, but I have no idea how to get the business started! The idea is to publish novels (fiction), story books and comics. I don't have too much money though...I'm gonna take a bank loan just enough to start the business. How do I find all the information that I require for this business? any information or suggestions is well appreciated. thank you..

x

Admin 22.08.2007. 18:54

Publishing is a risky business. About as risky as opening a restaurant. So before you rush out to start your own publishing house, why not look around. See if there are any publishing houses in your area. Go and speak with them. Maybe see if you can get a job there first to observe from the inside.

As for information gathering, contact associations for literary presses, speak to people at writers' organizations, try to find some retired publishers for their take on the industry. Talk to independent booksellers - they have a closer relationship with publishers than the managers of the chain stores. Talk to some authors you know.

Those are just the places to start.

You also have to have a long conversation with yourself. Are you cut out to be a publisher? How much money will you need? Can you afford to do it. It takes an average of nine months to produce a book. Then it has to sell. In the meantime, the author will want an advance, the designer, editor, printer will want to be paid. There are other office costs. Then there's the marketing. Are you a shit-hot marketer? This isn't a business for sissies. You'll need money for marketing, for a PR person, for book tour and launch ... it just goes on and on. And each book needs this treatment. Other than Harry Potter, no single book can sustain a publishing house. Can you afford to do several books a year?

So, while you're shelling out all this money, what will you live on? And what it the book doesn't sell well? What if bookstores fold or hold back their payments, or flood you with returns? Oh yes, what do you know about distribution?

There is a lot you have to learn and be prepared for, not to mention all the surprises along the way.

And we haven't even touched on competition. The big publishers get the best spaces in book stores. A lot of stores won't stock books by new, unproven houses.

Then, how are you going to attract writers? The problem won't be in getting manuscripts - everyone with access to a keyboard thinks they can write. The problem will be finding writers who are good and marketable. Meanwhile, how will you deal with all the manuscripts? I have a friend with a small literary press. He does eight books a year, yet receives over 500 manuscripts a year!

Think very seriously about this. You might be better off trying to sell your writing to others and doing a website or blog.

Admin

jg 21.07.2012. 07:49

Why were so many people surprised to find out that Rock Hudson was gay? Array

jg

Admin 21.07.2012. 07:49

Because his studio and managers went to great lengths to keep it that way, even to the point of arranging a "marriage" to his (IIRC) secretary when people started to wonder. Never underestimate the ability of a PR flack.

Edit: For what it's worth, I had a roommate at the time of Hudson's death. Mike was gay. He told me at the time that pretty much the entire gay community knew about Rock Hudson, but they all kept quiet about it to protect his career.

Admin

Mike 04.12.2011. 14:16

why is god of war 3 not working on 1920*1080 resolution on my tv ? my tv is 1080p hd and it says that you can play god of war 3 on 1080p but when i play the game its only on 1280*1024 but its not 1920*1080 can somebody please tell me?

Mike

Admin 04.12.2011. 14:16

While Sony likes to promote the PS3 as having the most power under the hood, one of their main franchises just got a bit of a downgrade in the specs department. On the PlayStation.Blog, Jeff Rubenstein, PR manager for Sony, revealed that ?God of War III?s native resolution is 720p with 1080 support.?

The news comes as a bit of a surprise since Sony had previously stated that GoW3 would feature 1080p as its native resolution. Despite the lowered resolution, the framerate is still expected to stick with the 60-30 fps variability as had been reported prior.

Will GoW3 be remembered for not having native 1080p support? Probably not. Will GoW3 be remembered as a phenomenal finish to an epic trilogy? That sounds more likely.

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