Equipping Your Home Office - Part 1

Comments (20)


Equipping Your Home Office - Part 1

By: Vishal P. Rao

Having an adequately equipped home office is essential to being productive. It is not necessary that everything be brand new, nor is it necessary that you spend a lot of money. What is important is that you select your items carefully and that they are functional and safe for use in a home office environment.

Check your telephone directory for used office furniture stores. Many time you can find very nice furniture available at a fraction of the cost. Don't forget to also check the resale store and thrift shops in your area, as well as the local classified ads.

1.) The Desk

Bigger is better when it comes to desks. Try to choose one that has lots of room for your computer monitor, keyboard, telephone, and space to spread out paperwork and anything else that you may be working on at the moment. Pick a desk that has adequate drawer space and a file drawer for short-term filing of active projects.

If you choose a desk that has a built-in keyboard support shelf, make sure that the shelf it wide enough to hold your keyboard and still have plenty of room to let you perform natural mouse moment. Some of the new keyboard designs, such as the Microsoft "Natural", are wider than standard keyboards.

2.) The Chair

Proper back and neck support is essential when you spend all day sitting down. Buy the best chair that you can afford. Your chair must have solid upper and lower (or lumbar) back support. A flimsy backrest puts stress on your spine while you're seated and causes back pain. Look for a chair where the lower portion of a backrest is slightly curved to follow the natural contour of your spine.

You chair's seat seat should feel comfortable when you initially sit down, and should remain that way after you've been seated for a significant period of time. If the seat becomes uncomfortable then the foam padding may not be a high enough density, or the contouring may not be right for your body.

Make sure you have plenty of room around your hips and thighs. You should have at least one inch of space on either side of your body. It is also important that your chair's seat properly supports your thighs without the edge of the seat coming in contact with the back of your legs while you are sitting.

3.) File Cabinets

To keep your home office organized, and avoid clutter, you are going to need filing cabinets. There essentially two different files cabinets that are perfect for a home office. Here is a quick summary:

a) Vertical file cabinets

This is the most common file cabinet. Vertical cabinets are taller than they are wide so that they use a minimum amount of wall space. They have anywhere from two to five drawers and are the right size to hold hold letter and legal-size documents. They come in a variety of colors and gauges of steel. If you can afford to buy one that is fireproof, so much the better.

b) Lateral file cabinets

Lateral cabinets are wider than vertical cabinets, but not as deep, and are designed for high-volume storage capacity. They have anywhere from two to five drawers and can hold letter or legal-size documents. Files are either placed in the cabinet from left to right, facing the side of the drawer, or are arranged from front to back in multiple rows.

Many two-drawer lateral models are designed to fit underneath work surfaces and tables for additional storage and are often paired with a desk to increase horizontal space. Again, if you find one that is fireproof, and you can afford it, snap it up.

4.) Bookshelves

Bookshelves should be made of wood or metal. Avoid the fiberboard ones since they are flimsy and do not stand up to repeated usage. Like file cabinets, bookshelves come in vertical and lateral. Avoid vertical ones that stand too tall. There is a chance of them becoming top-heavy and falling over. Pay particular attention to this warning if you live in an earthquake area or if you have small children which may delight in climbing to the top of your bookcase.

5.) Work Tables

Worktables are great for spreading out large projects that your desk is not big enough to accommodate. If you have enough home office space for a permanent work table, that's great. Otherwise consider buying a folding table that you can take out when you need it and store away when you do not.

6.) Storage

Closets, garages, attics and crawl spaces make great places to store completed projects and home office paperwork if the space is not damp or subject to high humidity. If storage is a real problem then you might need to consider renting an off-premise storage locker.

Think of your office furniture as the foundation of your productivity center. It is likely that you will have to live with your decisions for some time. Choose wisely. Your personal comfort, and ability to remain organized, depend upon it. If you outgrow your furniture later, or simply make enough money that you want to "kick it up a notch", your investment will pay off because you will likely be able to get a great deal of your money back when you sell your old office furniture to make room for the new.

Copyright Vishal P. Rao

About The Author

Vishal P. Rao is the editor of Home Based Business Opportunities - A web site dedicated to opportunities, ideas and resources to help you start and run a home based business. Visit his site at: http://www.home-based-business-opportunities.com

Comments

t_c5 16.11.2007. 03:21

Anyone have any really good ideas for a business start-up in Western Washington? I have some ideas of my own, as well as friends & colleagues inputs, but now I am looking elsewhere for fresh new ideas.
Here is some info that might be helpful: total start-up costs...trying to stay well under $8,000.00, would like to start right away, would like to start seeing profits immediately.
If anyone has any good ideas, please let me know.
THANKS!!

t_c5

Admin 16.11.2007. 03:21

It is very difficult to stay "well under" $8,000, so consider how that limits your choices:

1. You can't have a business that runs out of a store or office. Equipping a place like that would eat up much of your capital. You need to choose something you can do from your home, at least at first.

2. Most businesses that sell a product are going to be difficult as well, because you will have costs for inventory.

3. An earlier answer suggested a hot dog or pretzel stand, and you might be able to do something like that, but you need a good location, with lots of pedestrian traffic. Mostly, that means you need to be in a large city. If you include Seattle as part of Western Washington, then it might work. But forget about any location that people would have to drive to. No one is going to get in a car to drive to buy a pretzel from a stand. That lets out most suburban locations and all small towns. There is also the problem of weather at this time of year. With winter coming, fewer people will want to eat outside at a stand, and fewer people will be strolling by wherever you set up.

4. So, given your small amount of cash, your best bet is a service business. What do you know how to do? Can you teach a skill? Can you fix or build something? Are you a great baker? Figure out what you know how to do very well, and advertise your service.

Starting a business is hard work and frankly, immediate profits are rare. That's why more people work for a business than have their own. But it can be done, and I wish you very good luck!!

Admin

Fraz 02.01.2013. 01:50

Study tips and other things to know for 2nd semester? I just finished my very first semester at university and it didn't go so well. I got a B+, a C+, two Cs and a big fat F. Obviously, my parents were not impressed, myself included. It's very frustrating as well, because I did well on my homework projects and did them all, but no matter how much time, effort and studying I put in, I am a horrible test-taker and failed many of my tests. I really do love university, and I've made great friends and love the atmosphere, but my parents told me if the next semester looks like the first grades-wise, they won't support me financially so in other words, I'll have to drop out. So my questions are, what are your best study tips? I feel like I've tried everything. And anything else I should expect? Any stories you would like to share. Thanks!

Also: In high school I was an A average student. I really didn't party that much either at university, so I don't think it was just laziness being the reason I flunked.

Fraz

Admin 02.01.2013. 01:50

1. Take charge of this thing. College isn't like high school. There's no teacher or parent to remind you every day of what you need to do. So step up to bat and take responsibility. What grades you get will depend on what you yourself do.
2. . Select, don't settle. To get good grades in college, it's very important that you pick the right courses. Pick classes that you think you can do. And be sure to pick the right level in required courses such as math, English comp, sciences, and languages (in some colleges, there are five courses all bearing the name "college math")
3. Don't overload. Some students think it's a mark of pride to take as many hours as the college allows. It isn't. Take four or at the most five courses each semester. And, unless you are very special, don't take more than one major. Each major comes equipped with 10 or 12 required courses, and you can really kill your GPA if you're taking lots of required?that is, forced?courses in a major that you're only half-interested in.
4. . Make a plan. Part of getting good grades is balancing off the various things you have to do, week by week. So get a calendar?electronic is good?and enter in all your classes, exams, and papers, and professors' office hours (more on that later)
5. Get your a** to class. Most students have a cutting budget: the number of lectures they can miss in each course and still do well. But if there are 35 class meetings, each class has about 3 percent of the content. Miss seven, and that's 20 percent.
6. Be a robo-notetaker. In many intro courses, the professor's lectures form the major part of the material tested on the midterm and final. So you should be writing down everything the professor says in the lecture.
7. Avoid do-overs. It's a really bad idea to plan to do things twice: recording the lectures with the idea of listening to them again when you get home, doing the reading three times, copying over your notes the day before the test. Focus as hard as you can the first time and do a really good job.
8. Study like you mean it. At college, you're expected to prepare an hour or two (sometimes more) for each class meeting. This means budgeting the time each week and finding an appropriate "study environment." No devices, no social networking, no friends, no eating?just your mind up against the work. We know this can be painful?but all students who get A's do this (no matter what they tell you).
9. Double up on tests. Before each test, take a practice test you make up, with questions similar to the ones you expect on the real test. Write it out under test conditions (no notes, limited time). Use handouts, study guides, homeworks and labs, old exams, and hints from the prof or TA to construct the test. If you get to a test and the questions look surprising to you, you haven't really prepared properly.
10. Don't be a Wiki-potamus. If your course has a research paper, make sure you use proper, scholarly materials. Look to the assignment sheet and/or instructions in lecture or section to see what the prof is expecting. Above all, forget about Wikipedia and blind Google searches: These typically do not yield the sort of content that is right for a college paper.
11. Hook up" with the prof. The most underused resource at college?and the one most likely to benefit your grade?is the office hour, either in person or electronic. This is really the only time that you can get one-on-one help from a prof or TA.
12. Join a community. Many students, especially in the sciences, improve their grades with "study buddies" or study groups?especially when their cohorts are smarter than they. Try to meet at least once a week?especially in courses in which there are weekly problem sets or quizzes. Students can improve their grades one level (or more) when they commit to working in an organized way with other students.

Admin

Emma 16.04.2012. 18:02

What are some key facts of the haiti Earthquake? For my home work I have to write a newspaper report on the haiti earthquake. I have to included things like :
magnitude
the duriation
what the effects had on the land around it
and so on...
thank you for yur help!!!x

Emma

Admin 16.04.2012. 18:02

2010 Haiti Earthquake Facts

"These Haiti Earthquake Facts were compiled shortly after the earthquake. See below for a more recent update to the earthquake facts.

This was a 7.0 magnitude earthquake .
The USGS says this was the strongest earthquake to hit the area that is now known as Haiti since 1770.
61 reported dead and 180 people unaccounted for, mostly Haitian national staff according to UN numbers. (It is my opinion this number is way too low.)
Porte-au-Prince's population is 2,000,000

The Haitian government estimates 200,000 have died as a result of this sad incident. 1/21/10
2,000,000 people have been left homeless.
3,000,000 people are in need of emergency aid.
January 20, 2010 - 5.9 magnitude aftershock that did little damage.
$195 million dollars in aid has been received so far with another $112 million dollars pledged according to one report.
Another states that $575 million has been collected via agencies like the World Food Program and UNICEF.
The U.S. government has so far given $171 million in humanitarian aid to the Haiti earthquake relief efforts as of 1/21/10.
The USAID's Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance share is $82 million.
The USAID's Office of Food for Peace contribution amounts to $68 million.
USAID Dominican Republic health related assistance totals $1 million.
3 million meals have been delivered to 200,000 people. This is far short of the 3,000,000 people believed to have been effected by this quake.
UN allocated $40 million for cash for work programs to employ Haitians to help clear away all the rubble.
9,000 peace keepers in Haiti with another 3,500 to be sent there soon.

As of January 20th the US military has 2,000 troops on the ground assisting now with another 2,000 airborne personal on the way there. An additional 9,500 personal are afloat standing by nearby.
The US has flown 136 air missions bringing 2,400 tons of food and supplies and 1,900 passengers into Haiti.
The Toussaint L?Ouverture International Airport is open 24/7 with 153 flights scheduled for January 21st. Of those 38 were US support flights.
On January the 19th 165,000 bottles of water and 152,000 liters of bulk water were distributed.
The US Navy's Nimitz class USS Carl Vinson is producing 100,000 gallons of drinkable water per day.
Water tanks are being built in different parts of the city.
38.5 tons of water, or 62,880 bottles of water have been distributed by the U.S. Coast Guard to date.
14,500 MRE's, Meals Ready to Eat, and 15,000 liters of water are scheduled to be air dropped via C-17 on January the 21st.
So far there are 4 food and water distribution hubs. These 4 hubs distribute the supplies to 190 distribution points that reach 96,000 people
Mexico plans to send doctors, infrastructure damage experts and search and resue dogs aid.
China will help out with $1 million.
Ireland: Digicel, an Irish telecommunications company, is donating $5 million directly to relief agencies providing aid in Haiti. Since the company is a prominent cell-phone company in the Caribbean, they will also send specialists to assist in repairing damaged phone networks.
France Has committed 65 clearing specialists, 6 sniffer dogs, 2 doctors and 2 nurses.
The Netherlands will provide $2.9 million.
Spain has pledged $4.3 million to relief efforts.
Italy is in the process of sending a C-130 cargo plane that is equipped with a emergency medical personal and a mobile field hospital.
Haiti's population is about 9 million people.
Haiti is the poorest Western Hemisphere country.
Haiti is about the same size as Maryland.
Port-au-Prince is the capital of Haiti.
Of Haiti's 14 airports only 4 have runways that are paved."

Have a pleasant day.

Admin

ktbaby022 16.07.2007. 22:11

Clueless about a laptop for college? I am getting a laptop for college this week and all I need is a basic one. I dont play games or anything but I will most likely be watching movies and listening to music on it. I want to spend under $1000, preferably around $600 - $700. I have an HP Desktop at home and a Gateway desktop and I like bpth of those brands, but I really dont want either of those for college. I'm also unsure of the brands I've never heard of such as Acer. Are any of those off brands good? Any suggestions of what would work best for me or what I need to look for processor and memory wise. I really know nothing about what to look for in a laptop so all advice and links would be great! Thanks so much!

ktbaby022

Admin 16.07.2007. 22:11

These are the five most recommended laptops:

1)HP Pavilion dv5000z Turion 64. it includes: Windows XP Media Center Edition; 2.2GHz Turion 64 ML-40; 1,024MB DDR SDRAM PC2700 333MHz; ATI Mobility Radeon Xpress 200 128MB; Fujitsu MHV2120AT PL 120GB 4,200rpm. With an AMD processor it starts at a highly affordable $679. It weighs about 6.5 pounds and like its predecessors, is full of entertainment features, but also does well in productivity. Although it is not quite suited for optimum gaming experience, it does come with an integrated 802.11 a/b/g wireless with Bluetooth and an amazing 12 cell battery.

2)Sony Vaio SZ. It includes: Windows XP Pro; 1.83GHz Intel Core Duo T2400; 1024MB DDR2 SDRAM PC4300 533MHz; Nvidia GeForce Go 7400 128MB; Fujitsu MHV2100HB 80GB 4,200rpm. At only 3.8 pounds, it provides a good sized screen and a usable keyboard. It includes an integrated microphone, Webcam, Intel Core Duo processor, an Nvidia graphics card, Bluetooth, and 802.11a/b/g wireless. Although it starts at $1,400 and a good unit can cost as much as $2,500, if price is no objective, this is a great model.

3)Acer TravelMate 4650. It includes: Windows XP Pro; 2GHz Intel Pentium M 760; 1GB DDR2 PC4300 SDRAM 533MHz; Intel 915GM/GMS 910GML Express 128MB; Seagate ST9100822A 100GB 5,400rpm. It has amazing performance, battery life, and features for both home and office needs. Starting at $1,149, it weights 6.4 pounds with a 15 inch screen. It comes with the Acer signature curved keyboard, a hand Wi-Fi on/off button, and for the most part is quiet except for the DVD burner. For its low price it is well worth the money. But remember that Acer is probably the worst in phone support.

4)Acer Aspire 9504WSMi. It includes: Windows XP Media Center; 2GHz Intel Pentium M 760; 2GB PC4300 DDR2 SDRAM 533MHz; ATI Mobility Radeon X700 256MB; Seagate Momentum 5400.2 120GB 5,400rpm. At $1,999 it is well worth the price. As another desktop replacement, it comes with a built-in TV tuner, a 17 inch display, Wi-Fi, and speakers along the front edge so while the laptop is closed, you can still hear. However, it only comes with one USB 2.0 port and weighs a whooping 8.5 pounds. However comparing to most other desktop replacements, it performs faster.

5)HP Pavilion dv8000. It includes: Windows XP Professional; 2.2GHz Turion 64 ML-40; 1,024MB PC 2700 DDR SDRAM 333MHz; ATI Mobility Radeon Xpress 200 series 128MB; Seagate ST9100822A 100GB 4,200rpm, Toshiba MK1031GAS 100GB 4,200rpm. If you are looking for a laptop that will get the job done, this is the one for you. It can replace your desktop and compared to other laptops that are desktop replacements, this one comes relatively cheap at $1,600. Since it is considered to be a desktop replacement, it is a bit on the heavy side 7.3 pounds. So, if you plan on carrying your laptop with you everywhere you go, you may want to reconsider. Equipped with a huge 17 inch screen, an integrated Wi-Fi, and Altec lansing speakers, this laptop is good from in the classroom to watching movies and listening to music.

*I don't believe I've heard of any problems with these notebooks.*

GOOD LUCK =)

Admin

Lia 20.01.2008. 21:55

Can a minor receive work and pay in NC? I am 14 years and pregnant. My mom is helping me out but I think it is my responsibility to help, so I'm looking for a job this summer. If anyone has any options please post them.

Lia

Admin 20.01.2008. 21:55

Yes, you can work.

Information re: child labor in NC:
http://www.nclabor.com/wh/fact%20sheets/joint_state_fed.htm

Young persons 14 and 15 years of age may be employed outside school hours in a variety of non-manufacturing and non-hazardous/non-detrimental jobs for limited periods of time and under specified conditions.

Hours Standards for 14- and 15-Year-Olds

Child Labor Regulation No. 3, 29 CFR Part 570, Subpart C, (CL Reg 3),and the North Carolina youth employment provisions limit the hours and the times of day that 14- and 15-year-olds may work to:

* outside school hours*;
* no more than 3 hours on a school day (including Friday);
* no more than 8 hours on a nonschool day;
* no more than 18 hours during a week when school is in session
* no more than 40 hours during a week when school is not in session;
* between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m., except between June 1 and Labor day when the evening hour is extended to 9 p.m.
* Youths under the age of 16 must be given at least a 30-minute break after five consecutive hours of work under the Wage Hour Act.
* School hours are determined by the local public school in the area the minor is residing while employed. This is true even if the minor does not attend the public school (i.e. attends a private school or is home-schooled).
* Fourteen- and 15-year-olds may work in most office jobs and retail and food service establishments, but may not work in processing, mining or in any workroom or workplace where goods are manufactured or processed.
* Fourteen- and 15-year-olds may be employed in food preparation, but they may not perform any baking activities and may only perform cooking which involves the use of (1) electric or gas grills that do not entail cooking over an open flame, and (2) deep fat fryers that are equipped with and utilize devices that automatically lower and raise the baskets into and out of the oil or grease as specified in federal Fact Sheet #58. NEW
* Fourteen- and 15-year-olds may be employed in occupations such as bagging groceries, office work, stocking shelves or cashiering.
* Fourteen- and 15-year-olds are also prohibited from working in any of the hazardous orders, detrimental occupations, or in occupations involving transportation, construction, warehousing, communications and public utilities.
* Fourteen- and 15-year-olds may not operate most power-driven machinery, including lawn mowers, lawn trimmers and weed cutters. Such youth may operate most office machines and certain equipment found in food service establishments such as dishwashers, toasters, dumbwaiters, popcorn poppers, milk shake blenders, and coffee grinders.

Admin

sethsgrandma 07.04.2009. 14:06

What is the best way to keep your house clean? Array

sethsgrandma

Admin 07.04.2009. 14:06

Establish a cleaning "routine" I "clean" my home for about 1-2 hours a day which is broken up into segments. Here's how mine works.. I have a 3 bdrm. 1 1/2 bathroom home w/ a finished family-room basement, laundry room and office... about 1,700 square ft. of living space.... I work part time (cleaning) in the evenings and have 2 toddlers, husband and a large-breed dog!

In the AM- I will do the following EVERYDAY!

Wipe down the bathroom with LYSOL anti-bacterial wipes
Clean the mirror and wipe out the sink....toilets

Kitchen-

Wipe down countertopsappliances with Lysol anti-bact. wipes
Unload dishwasher- make breakfast for kids and reload dishwasher
*Load dishwasher AFTER every meal....
Sweep or vacuum kitchen... Take out trash....


While the kids are eating...

Livingroom/Diningroom:

Dust with microfiber cloth
Clean electronics/tv/stereo equip

Vacuum EVERYDAY. Keeps dust down....

Bedrooms-

Make beds.... Dust furniture with microfiber cloth...

* In between rooms I'll toss a load of laundry into the washer or transfer to dryer.. .I only run ONE major appliance at a time. For us it saves on electric, water and heat...

BASEMENT FAMILYROOM/PLAYROOM and LAUNDRYROOM- I do these rooms about 1 time a week.. Since not many people see them I cheat a little.. But when I do them I DEEP CLEAN them!

OFFICE- Straighten daily, vacuum everyday and mop tile entry 2x a week...

Then once a week.. I'll pick a room and DEEP it..

BATHROOM:

Clean sink,tub,toilets
Wash and replace rugs/towels
Sweep/mop floors.....

KITCHEN:

WIPE down cabinets
WIPE down and clean appliances
CLEAN out the fridge(s)/freezer(s)

SWEEP and MOP

BEDROOMS

STRIP beds and wash/replace bedding.... VACUUM mattress & Spray mattress with LYSOL and let it air dry.....

POLISH furniture with PLEDGE/microfiber cloth....

This works for me- it doesn't take me long to clean this particular house.. I use convience products when I can...

My house is most often tidy and my children and husband DO help me by tidying up while I'm at work at night.... They pick-up toys and books so when I come home I can RELAX!

I also DON'T have a lot of clutter I'm constantly getting rid of things I no longer need like kids toys, clothing and furniture... I use FREECYCLE.ORG, and craigslist.com to get rid of things I no longer need. I also use GIVEFREELY.COM which is local to our community they have Sat. pickups and it's tax deductible....

good luck

Admin

Foodeefunk 13.09.2006. 20:23

I have about $750 to work with.Need Professional Digital Camera and PC/Notebook? I have $750 to spend. I need a professional digital camera. (5 MegaPixels or more, that would be good for a college digital photography class. The more features the better) I also need a new computer. It can be a laptop or tower. The tower can be built from separate parts. (Like from NewEgg or similar website).

Foodeefunk

Admin 13.09.2006. 20:23

Note: When clicking on a link, click on the back button to return to this page.

Digital Cameras:

HP Photosmart E327 Digital Camera
Price: $99.99*

? 5 megapixels (2560 x 1920 pixels)
? High-resolution prints up to poster size 4x digital zoom
? 1.8" color image display (viewable outdoors)
? 16MB memory, expandable with memory cards
? 90-day limited warranty

HP Photosmart M425 Digital Camera
Price: $129.99*

? 5 megapixels (2576 x 1920 pixels)
? High-resolution prints up to poster size
? 18x total zoom (3x optical, 6x digital)
? 1.7" color image display (viewable outdoors)
? 16MB memory, expandable with memory cards
? In-camera red-eye removal, HP Design Gallery
? 90-day limited warranty

* Prices, promotions, specifications, availability and terms of offers may change without notice. Despite our best efforts, a small number of items may contain pricing, typography, or photography errors. Correct prices and promotions are validated at the time your order is placed. Please note these policies apply only to products sold by the HP Home & Home Office Store; reseller offers may vary.

Note: These are TODAY'S prices. So act quickly before they are gone.

http://www.shopping.hp.com/webapp/shopping/can.do?storeName=storefronts&category=digital_cameras&a1=Megapixel&v1=Under+6+MP&catLevel=2&aoid=33326&kw=5+megapixel+digital+camera

Canon PowerShot A530 Digital Camera:

Overview

Sleek, powerful and eminently portable, the PowerShot A530 Digital Camera from Canon packs easy-to-use impressive features in a stylish design. Equipped with 5.0 MP CCD, the camera captures rich details with excellent clarity. The 4X optical zoom lens closes up a wide angle, while 4X digital zoom lets you focus on small details with ease. Incorporated ISO 800 setting reduces the effects of camera shake and sharpens subjects in low-light situations when shooting with high shutter speeds, giving you greater flexibility for shooting. In addition, its iSAPS technology works with the DIGIC imaging processor to enhance focusing speed and accuracy, as well as exposure and white balance. The PowerShot A530 enables you to record VGA (640 x 480) at 10 fps or QVGA (320 x 240) movies at 20 fps with sound. Also, with Compact Movie Mode, you can shoot QQVGA (160 x 120) at 15 fps. With an additional 17 shooting modes, including the settings in Special Scene mode, you can produce breathtaking pictures even when shooting conditions are tough. With the PictBridge? compatibility, you can directly connect the camera to a compatible printer for easy direct printing and downloads.

Highlights

5.0 MP CCD captures rich details with excellent clarity
4X optical zoom for wide angle coverage, while 4X digital zoom for acquiring fine details
View your images before and after on the 1.8" TFT Color LCD monitor
iSAPS technology works with the fast DIGIC Imaging Processor for fast processing and excellent image quality
Print/Share Button for easy direct printing and downloads in addition to ID Photo Print and Movie Print

$199.99

http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/productdetail.aspx?c=us&l=en&s=dhs&cs=19&sku=A0620513


Tower Computer:

Dell Dimension E521
Excellent Versatility and Performance
Our first AMD® -powered PC offers a range of performance options for entry-level and performance users alike.


AMD® processors up to Athlon® X2
Genuine Windows® XP Media Center Edition 2005
on select systems
Windows Vista Capable1
Up to 17" Flat Panel Included

Featured at $329

http://www.dell.com/content/products/category.aspx/dimen?c=us&cs=19&l=en&s=dhs

http://www.dell.com/content/products/productdetails.aspx/dimen_e521?c=us&cs=19&l=en&s=dhs&~ck=mn

Note: This link is to Dell's Outlet store of used and refurbished computers; here you might get more bang for your buck.

http://www.dell.com/content/products/compare.aspx/dimen?c=us&cs=22&l=en&s=dfh

Printer:

Dell Photo All-In-One Printer 964
Performance All-In-One

Print/Scan/Copy

Fax

Direct Photo Printing

HIGHLIGHTS:
33.6 Kbps built in fax modem
Unattended multi-page faxing, scanning and photocopying with 50 page auto document feeder
2.4" color LCD for viewing photos
Media slots let you print photos directly from your memory card
PictBridge support lets you print directly from your camera
Share your printer on your wireless network with optional Dell Wireless Printer Adapter
Compatible with Microsoft® Windows® 2000 , Windows XP and Windows XP 64 Bit

From
$204
Printer Cable Included
Free photo cartridge ($26 value) + 1 pack paper (8.5x11, 30 pages, $19 value)

http://www.dell.com/content/products/compare.aspx/allinone?c=us&cs=19&l=en&s=dhs

http://www.dell.com/content/products/productdetails.aspx/print_964?c=us&cs=19&l=en&s=dhs

PC + Printer + Camera {prices exclude shipping (which is usually free)}

$329 + $204 + $99.99 = $632.99 + 9% tax = $689.96
$329 + $204 + $129.99 = $662.99 + 9% tax = $722.66
$329 + $204 + $199.99 = $732.99 + 9% tax = $798.96

Admin

khasterial 06.07.2007. 21:34

How do I get through this - my parents' separation/ impending divorce? I am 21, about to start my senior year of college, and my parents are separating in August. I am not completely emotionally stable, although I am very good at appearing so. I don't want to take sides, and I don't want to return "home" next year. Unfortunately, I cannot support myself financially. Do you have any advice on how to get through this without hurting either one of my parents and without having an emotional meltdown? Any advice would be appreciated, including how to tell my friends and how to deal with it while I'm away at college. Please don't advise therapy, I have done that previously, and it did not work out very well for me. I just would like some coping mechanisms to get me through the next year or so.

khasterial

Admin 06.07.2007. 21:34

At 21, you are better equipped to manage your feelings about a divorce than some younger children. Still, it's not a picnic, and you'll probably have moments where you feel like yelling or crying.

Here's some suggstions on how to manager your fears and concerns regarding your parents divorce/separation:

1) This is not about you. Whatever your parent's feelings may be about each other, they should be supportive and caring towards you. You are old enough that no dispute should arise re custody, and I would suspect that they will not create difficulties in your completing college. If they do (or if one uses it as a threat in divorce proceedings), the judge should get involved immediately.

2) Don't take sides. Explain that you love and care about both of them, that you will not carry messages, gripes, or apologies from one to the other, and that you expect them to realize that your feelings are affected if they speak badly or abusively about the other parent. Divorces are one of the few times (or perhaps many) times that adults act childishly, and it is important for you to be neutral in this. It may not be possible (and by no mean should you ignore your own feelings) but you should try to keep your perspective -- this is a one-time event. It will be done, and while it may be painful and disheartening, you and they (your parents) will survive it.

3) Start making plans about WHAT you will do if certain things don't work out as you may have planned or expected. For example, you may have to take a year off from college...or perhaps get a part-time job. Think about the things you need on a daily, monthly, and yearly basis, the activities that you are accustomed to, and plan a budget. See what kind of financial aid may be available to you in terms of student loans as a single adult. Talk to your college financial aid office and/or your faculty educational advisor. What about housing? Are you living at home? Family assets tend to be sold if they are not designated as belonging to one or the other parent...so figure out if you can find housing with a roomie or in a dorm.

4) Don't simply sit around and mope. Get up, get out, and get active. If you want to journal your feelings, do that for no more than 30 minutes. Make a point of getting exercise every day (even if it is just walking at a steady clip for 30 minutes). Stick to a normal diet and sleep pattern as much as possible.

5) Build a support network. Tell your friends what's going on -- not the dirty details of who did what or why, just that it is happening. Chances are that one of them is also from a divorced family and can give you some good advice or a shoulder to cry on.

6) Give yourself a break. You've more than likely been stifling or suppressing your feelings about a lot of stuff, and you won't get by doing that for long. We all have a point where we need to vent, so if you don't have someone to vent to professionally (like a therapist) find a good buddy, go talk it out, and get it said and felt. You'll feel better, and it WILL give you more perspective on the future events.

7) Set some boundaries. You can and should be a part of your parent's lives, but you shouldn't be dragged into this between them...and YOU will know when something doesn't feel right. Biting your lip over a cruel comment is ok, but being asked to give a judgment or make a condemnation of the other parent is wrong. Stay out of it and if they won't stop asking you to do it, leave.

Good luck!

Admin

Cutiepie 06.11.2006. 13:10

Is physical therapy a good career choice? I am in between majors and would like to know

Cutiepie

Admin 06.11.2006. 13:10

I work as an Occupational Therapy Assistant and have done so for over 16 years. I find it very rewarding and more involved.

Physical Therapy is also rewarding.

Here is more on it. Significant Points

Employment is expected to increase much faster than the average, as growth in the number of individuals with disabilities or limited functioning spurs demand for therapy services.
Job opportunities should be particularly good in acute hospital, rehabilitation, and orthopedic settings.
After graduating from an accredited physical therapist educational program, therapists must pass a licensure exam before they can practice.
Nearly 6 out of 10 physical therapists work in hospitals or in offices of physical therapists.
Nature of the Work

Physical therapists provide services that help restore function, improve mobility, relieve pain, and prevent or limit permanent physical disabilities of patients suffering from injuries or disease. They restore, maintain, and promote overall fitness and health. Their patients include accident victims and individuals with disabling conditions such as low-back pain, arthritis, heart disease, fractures, head injuries, and cerebral palsy.

Therapists examine patients? medical histories and then test and measure the patients? strength, range of motion, balance and coordination, posture, muscle performance, respiration, and motor function. They also determine patients? ability to be independent and reintegrate into the community or workplace after injury or illness. Next, physical therapists develop plans describing a treatment strategy, its purpose, and its anticipated outcome. Physical therapist assistants, under the direction and supervision of a physical therapist, may be involved in implementing treatment plans with patients. Physical therapist aides perform routine support tasks, as directed by the therapist. (Physical therapist assistants and aides are discussed elsewhere in the Handbook.)

Treatment often includes exercise for patients who have been immobilized and lack flexibility, strength, or endurance. Physical therapists encourage patients to use their own muscles to increase their flexibility and range of motion before finally advancing to other exercises that improve strength, balance, coordination, and endurance. The goal is to improve how an individual functions at work and at home.

Physical therapists also use electrical stimulation, hot packs or cold compresses, and ultrasound to relieve pain and reduce swelling. They may use traction or deep-tissue massage to relieve pain. Therapists also teach patients to use assistive and adaptive devices, such as crutches, prostheses, and wheelchairs. They also may show patients exercises to do at home to expedite their recovery.

As treatment continues, physical therapists document the patient?s progress, conduct periodic examinations, and modify treatments when necessary. Besides tracking the patient?s progress, such documentation identifies areas requiring more or less attention.

Physical therapists often consult and practice with a variety of other professionals, such as physicians, dentists, nurses, educators, social workers, occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, and audiologists.

Some physical therapists treat a wide range of ailments; others specialize in areas such as pediatrics, geriatrics, orthopedics, sports medicine, neurology, and cardiopulmonary physical therapy.
Working Conditions

Physical therapists practice in hospitals, clinics, and private offices that have specially equipped facilities, or they treat patients in hospital rooms, homes, or schools. They also work in nursing homes.

In 2004, most full-time physical therapists worked a 40-hour week; some worked evenings and weekends to fit their patients? schedules. About 1 in 4 physical therapists worked part time. The job can be physically demanding because therapists often have to stoop, kneel, crouch, lift, and stand for long periods. In addition, physical therapists move heavy equipment and lift patients or help them turn, stand, or walk.

Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement

All States require physical therapists to pass a licensure exam before they can practice, after graduating from an accredited physical therapist educational program.

According to the American Physical Therapy Association, there were 205 accredited physical therapist programs in 2004. Of the accredited programs, 94 offered master?s degrees, and 111 offered doctoral degrees. All physical therapist programs seeking accreditation are required to offer degrees at the master?s degree level and above, in accordance with the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education.

Physical therapist programs start with basic science courses such as biology, chemistry, and physics and then introduce specialized courses, including biomechanics, neuroanatomy, human growth and development, manifestations of disease, examination techniques, and therapeutic procedures. Besides getting classroom and laboratory instruction, students receive supervised clinical experience. Among the courses that are useful when one applies to a physical therapist educational program are anatomy, biology, chemistry, social science, mathematics, and physics. Before granting admission, many professional education programs require experience as a volunteer in a physical therapy department of a hospital or clinic. For high school students, volunteering with the school athletic trainer is a good way to gain experience.

Physical therapists should have strong interpersonal skills in order to be able to educate patients about their physical therapy treatments. Physical therapists also should be compassionate and possess a desire to help patients. Similar traits are needed to interact with the patient?s family.

Physical therapists are expected to continue their professional development by participating in continuing education courses and workshops. In fact, a number of States require continuing education as a condition of maintaining licensure.

Employment

Physical therapists held about 155,000 jobs in 2004. The number of jobs is greater than the number of practicing physical therapists, because some physical therapists hold two or more jobs. For example, some may work in a private practice, but also work part time in another health care facility.

Nearly 6 out of 10 physical therapists worked in hospitals or in offices of physical therapists. Other jobs were in home health care services, nursing care facilities, outpatient care centers, and offices of physicians.

Some physical therapists were self-employed in private practices, seeing individual patients and contracting to provide services in hospitals, rehabilitation centers, nursing care facilities, home health care agencies, adult day care programs, and schools. Physical therapists also teach in academic institutions and conduct research.

Employment of physical therapists is expected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations through 2014. The impact of proposed Federal legislation imposing limits on reimbursement for therapy services may adversely affect the short-term job outlook for physical therapists. However, over the long run, the demand for physical therapists should continue to rise as growth in the number of individuals with disabilities or limited function spurs demand for therapy services. Job opportunities should be particularly good in acute hospital, rehabilitation, and orthopedic settings, because the elderly receive the most treatment in these settings. The growing elderly population is particularly vulnerable to chronic and debilitating conditions that require therapeutic services. Also, the baby-boom generation is entering the prime age for heart attacks and strokes, increasing the demand for cardiac and physical rehabilitation. Further, young people will need physical therapy as technological advances save the lives of a larger proportion of newborns with severe birth defects.

JOB OUTLOOK
Future medical developments also should permit a higher percentage of trauma victims to survive, creating additional demand for rehabilitative care. In addition, growth may result from advances in medical technology that could permit the treatment of more disabling conditions.

Widespread interest in health promotion also should increase demand for physical therapy services. A growing number of employers are using physical therapists to evaluate worksites, develop exercise programs, and teach safe work habits to employees in the hope of reducing injuries in the workplace.

Earnings
Median annual earnings of physical therapists were $60,180 in May 2004. The middle 50 percent earned between $50,330 and $71,760. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $42,010, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $88,580. Median annual earnings in the industries employing the largest numbers of physical therapists in May 2004 were:

Home health care services $64,650
Nursing care facilities 61,720
Offices of physicians 61,270
General medical and surgical hospitals 60,350
Offices of other health practitioners 60,130

Remember, each place you work will be different. Nursing homes will pay more as well as contract companies. Hospitals pay less.

Admin

basechima 16.07.2007. 20:13

what is the best notebook to buy but cheapest? Array

basechima

Admin 16.07.2007. 20:13

These are the five most recommended laptops:

1)HP Pavilion dv5000z Turion 64. it includes: Windows XP Media Center Edition; 2.2GHz Turion 64 ML-40; 1,024MB DDR SDRAM PC2700 333MHz; ATI Mobility Radeon Xpress 200 128MB; Fujitsu MHV2120AT PL 120GB 4,200rpm. With an AMD processor it starts at a highly affordable $679. It weighs about 6.5 pounds and like its predecessors, is full of entertainment features, but also does well in productivity. Although it is not quite suited for optimum gaming experience, it does come with an integrated 802.11 a/b/g wireless with Bluetooth and an amazing 12 cell battery.

2)Sony Vaio SZ. It includes: Windows XP Pro; 1.83GHz Intel Core Duo T2400; 1024MB DDR2 SDRAM PC4300 533MHz; Nvidia GeForce Go 7400 128MB; Fujitsu MHV2100HB 80GB 4,200rpm. At only 3.8 pounds, it provides a good sized screen and a usable keyboard. It includes an integrated microphone, Webcam, Intel Core Duo processor, an Nvidia graphics card, Bluetooth, and 802.11a/b/g wireless. Although it starts at $1,400 and a good unit can cost as much as $2,500, if price is no objective, this is a great model.

3)Acer TravelMate 4650. It includes: Windows XP Pro; 2GHz Intel Pentium M 760; 1GB DDR2 PC4300 SDRAM 533MHz; Intel 915GM/GMS 910GML Express 128MB; Seagate ST9100822A 100GB 5,400rpm. It has amazing performance, battery life, and features for both home and office needs. Starting at $1,149, it weights 6.4 pounds with a 15 inch screen. It comes with the Acer signature curved keyboard, a hand Wi-Fi on/off button, and for the most part is quiet except for the DVD burner. For its low price it is well worth the money. But remember that Acer is probably the worst in phone support.

4)Acer Aspire 9504WSMi. It includes: Windows XP Media Center; 2GHz Intel Pentium M 760; 2GB PC4300 DDR2 SDRAM 533MHz; ATI Mobility Radeon X700 256MB; Seagate Momentum 5400.2 120GB 5,400rpm. At $1,999 it is well worth the price. As another desktop replacement, it comes with a built-in TV tuner, a 17 inch display, Wi-Fi, and speakers along the front edge so while the laptop is closed, you can still hear. However, it only comes with one USB 2.0 port and weighs a whooping 8.5 pounds. However comparing to most other desktop replacements, it performs faster.

5)HP Pavilion dv8000. It includes: Windows XP Professional; 2.2GHz Turion 64 ML-40; 1,024MB PC 2700 DDR SDRAM 333MHz; ATI Mobility Radeon Xpress 200 series 128MB; Seagate ST9100822A 100GB 4,200rpm, Toshiba MK1031GAS 100GB 4,200rpm. If you are looking for a laptop that will get the job done, this is the one for you. It can replace your desktop and compared to other laptops that are desktop replacements, this one comes relatively cheap at $1,600. Since it is considered to be a desktop replacement, it is a bit on the heavy side 7.3 pounds. So, if you plan on carrying your laptop with you everywhere you go, you may want to reconsider. Equipped with a huge 17 inch screen, an integrated Wi-Fi, and Altec lansing speakers, this laptop is good from in the classroom to watching movies and listening to music.

*I don't believe I've heard of any problems with these notebooks.*

GOOD LUCK =)

Admin

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