How to Fax the Credit Bureaus For Faster Credit

Comments (20)


Insider Etiquette: How To Stay in the Credit Bureau's Good Graces

Several of the credit bureaus have opened up their fax lines, (namely, Equifax and Transunion) but only to select consumers--only those a recent "confirmation number" or tracking number from a current credit report. In our ebook "Improve Your Credit Score In 24 Hours" we give you the fax numbers that credit bureaus keep secret. Since January 2003, we've sold 30,000 copies-this tremendous success has led to a high volume of unsolicited faxes from consumers, enough so that they have tightened their rules.

If you are in possession of a credit bureau fax number, either from us or from communication with a credit bureau, we'll outline the proper fax methods for you.

The ABCs of Faxing Your Way to Better Credit:

- Absolutely never send unsolicited faxes. You must include a confirmation number from a current credit report to fax the credit bureau.

- You only need to fax the credit bureau to get them something that you couldn't get them by phone or mail: usually a "deletion" or "collection paid" letter, clearing you of a bad credit item.

- Be sure to include required identification information. For Equifax for instance ID should include a photocopy of your driver's license and a copy of your social security card or a current utility bill.

- Always include your confirmation number. Comply with credit bureau faxing protocol by including a confirmation or tracking number from your current credit report.

By knowing when and how to fax the credit bureau, you can coordinate a quicker result when bettering your credit.

About the Author

L. K. Hughes is the author of "Improve Your Credit Score In 24 Hours".

Comments

? Mary ? 15.02.2007. 17:53

Is this the best way to pay off debt on credit report? Any other suggestions? I got my credit report so I know who and what I owe. I was going to start next month with the lowest amounts I owe and start paying them off. Now, should I call each one ask for a settlement amount? (Each one is at least 1 year old, so I think they would settle quite easily and nicely.)

Do I ask for something in writing before I pay? So then I can prove that I paid it off. Can I ask each one to make a note on my credit report to either say I paid it in full or to remove it? (and get that in writing?)

Should I contact the original place that held the debt or do I need to contact the collection agency it is with now?

Anything else I should know before I start dealing with the collection agencies again?

Thanks a bunch! I look forward to getting my credit score up!

? Mary ?

Admin 15.02.2007. 17:53

You need to deal with the collection agencies directly. After you pay the item off, request a letter showing you have a $0 balance, fax it to all three credit bureaus separately. (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion.) This is the fastest way to update your credit report, but it will still take around 3 months, as most places only update reports each quarter when it's something that will benefit you.

Remember that all three companies listed above most likely have different versions of your credit report, so you need a copy from each place to make sure you're paying off everything.

Once an item is paid in full, it will no be removed from your report for 7 years, even if you settle. It will simply show up as $0 owed.

Good job for taking care of this, but remember it could be years before you see a significant increase in your credit score. These companies are very difficult to deal with and you will spend lots of hours on the phone and emailing, faxing, etc.

Admin

Lars 12.03.2008. 05:08

I have a 590 credit score and need to raise it in order to get a refi on house,whats the fastest way to do it? Need to refinance by May, otherwise my payments go up $500. Is there a chance I can refinance at a lower rate and whats the fastest, easiest way to boost a credit score?

Lars

Admin 12.03.2008. 05:08

Hi Lars ...

I can tell you from personal experience that one of the fastest ways to boost your credit score is to pay down your debt. I have seen people with 700+ credit scores get turned down for loans because they are so high in personal debt. Here's is what my mortgage guy had me do when I bought my house and it worked. I raised my score almost 20 points in 2 months, but I needed his help.

1.) Every credit card or loan that is over 50% of your limit is VERY hurtful to your score. For instance, if your limit is $1,000 and you balance is $501.00 or over you get dinged big time for that. I paid down a few credit cards that were above 50% of my limit and it helped a lot.

2.) Do NOT close any credit accounts no matter what. This hurts your debt to credit ratio as well and can make your debt look even worse believe it or not.

3.) Check your credit report and contact the company's if there is any false or out dated info there. If it turns out to be true they must remove it by law which will also raise your score.

4.) Do not charge anything new or open any new accounts until your refi is over. That will hurt you big time. Every time you get an inquiry on your credit it lowers your credit score as well ... even if it's for a good reason.

Every time I made a positive change to my credit score my mortgage guy would fax the credit bureaus and ask them to bring my credit up to date. If you wait for them to do it, it could take 30+ days ... if it's a positive change and a mortgage guy is contacting them they are much more likely to make the change more quickly.

A good mortgage guy can help you with this easily. Just be sure you find a GOOD one and not one who will rip you off in the end. They are on your side because they get a commission if they get the loan so a good one will go out of his way to help you with your credit in any way possible. Ask them for help ... you'll be surprised at what they can do!

Best of luck to you!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Admin

Searcher 17.07.2006. 06:51

How to bring my address current with all 3 major credit bureaus? They still have my old (3 yrs. ago) address on file, and no record of my current address. I need to update them so I can get copies of my credit reports sent to me (at my proper/current address). I do not want them sent to my old address.

What is the fastest way to do this?

Can I do this online somehow?

Searcher

Admin 17.07.2006. 06:51

It's hard to do that type of change online. You can give it a try but they usually want proof of your address.

If online doesn't work, call them. When they will ask you to send proof, if you are in a big rush to get it changed, request a fax number so you can fax copies of anything they may request.

If they do, send them a copy of your electric bill or other utility bill. Be sure to mark out your account number. ALL they need to see is that it is in your name, on that bill, at that address, they don't need to see anything else.

If you have to send a copy of your drivers license, take a copy of it and mark out your DL number.

Admin

AggTech50 19.04.2008. 01:56

How do you collect the cash back rebate earned yearly from a VISA credit card? The Associated Bank sponsors this VISA cash rebate card, and the billing info reads REBATE DOLLARS EARNED YTD: $407.17 We have had this card over a year and I can not find out how to receive the money. Thanks , and yes the bank didn't seem to be much help so we are in the process of changing banks and I hate to go back.

AggTech50

Admin 19.04.2008. 01:56

Hello, I would first put a request in writing, certified mail. Keeping a copy for your records. I would contact your local commerce of banks, local federal reserve/equivalent,states attorney's office, and though it is just a reporting station I would leave a complaint with better business bureau.

This is something you have in writing regarding your cash back rebate and what's owed to you. If they don't honor you, consider putting in a small claims.

Check your local laws and if necessary, how the the laws apply where the card is from. Example, Delaware.

Good Luck

p.s. Here is some extra information

http://www.federalreserveconsumerhelp.gov/complaintinfo.cfm?info=4
Can I file a complaint?
You can file a complaint if you think a bank has been unfair or misleading, discriminated against you in lending, or violated a law or regulation. We investigate complaints related to federal consumer protection laws, such as the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, Fair Credit Reporting Act, and the Truth in Lending Act.

http://www.federalreserveconsumerhelp.gov/complaintinfo.cfm?info=1

How do I file a complaint?
First, try to settle the problem directly with your bank or financial institution. If you cannot resolve the problem, contact us for help.

To file a complaint, you can:

* Call us toll-free at 888-851-1920 (TTY: 877-766-8533) 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. CST
* E-mail us at ConsumerHelp@FederalReserve.gov
* Send us a fax at 877-888-2520
* Write to us at:
Federal Reserve Consumer Help
PO Box 1200
Minneapolis, MN 55480

In your complaint, be sure to include the following:

* Your name, address, and telephone number(s).
* The complete name and address of the bank involved in your complaint, if known.
* The names of those you dealt with at the bank, along with the dates.
* A description of the complaint. Tell us what happened. The more information we have about the problem, the faster we can investigate and respond. Include copies of letters or other documents that may help us investigate your complaint. Please send only copies of documents - do not send originals.

File your complaint online now. To file your complaint via fax or mail, download and print the consumer complaint form.


http://www.federalreserveconsumerhelp.gov/complaintinfo.cfm?info=2

What will the Federal Reserve do?
We will connect you with or forward your complaint to the appropriate federal regulator for the bank or institution involved in your complaint.

If your complaint is against a financial institution that the Federal Reserve supervises, it will be investigated by one of the 12 regional Federal Reserve Banks.

As the Reserve Bank investigates each issue raised in your complaint, it will:

* Ask the bank involved for information and records regarding your complaint.
* Determine if the bank's response addresses your concerns.
* Send you a letter about its findings.

The Reserve Bank may also contact you to request additional information necessary to complete its investigation.

The Reserve Bank will let you know if it finds an error or a violation of a federal law or regulation. Investigations typically take 30 to 60 days to complete. If more than 60 days have passed, the Reserve Bank will contact you to let you know the status of its investigation. Please note that it may take several months to investigate more complex complaints like those alleging illegal credit discrimination.

http://www.federalreserveconsumerhelp.gov/complaintinfo.cfm?info=3
What won't the Federal Reserve do?
Although the Federal Reserve looks into every complaint that involves the banks we regulate, we do not have the authority to resolve every type of problem. For example:

* We are unable to resolve contract disputes or undocumented factual disputes between a customer and a bank. In these cases, we suggest that you contact an attorney.
* We cannot investigate matters that are the subject of a pending lawsuit.
* We are unable to resolve complaints about customer service or disagreements over specific bank policies and procedures not addressed by federal law or regulation.

Admin

Casey 17.05.2009. 19:20

How do I work from home in a real company? No scammers? I just would like to work at home doing data entry or transcription but i dont want to have to buy the software or put any money into this business please help. Also about the surveys you can do on the net what ones actually pay you instead of just give you "points" please help also one omre thing what about reading emails anyone know about that

Casey

Admin 17.05.2009. 19:20

This is from the Better Business Bureau:
Recognizing a Work at Home Scam
Avoid falling victim to a work at home scam by recognizing the following warning signs in job advertisements:
? Boasts no experience necessary
? Promises easy money and huge part-time earnings
? Promotes having ?inside? business information
? Asks you to purchase products or instructions before getting ?hired?
Outcomes of a Work at Home Scam
Protect yourself from tempting work-at-home promotions that offer exaggerated benefits by being informed of the outcomes. The outcomes of work at home scams include: a waste of money, time, reputation, and morale.
Victims of work at home scams have reported losses ranging from $10 to $70,000. Although the money loss may be recovered, the countless hours that you spend on unfruitful projects can?t. You may also end up selling nonexistent services and poor products to your customers, making yourself vulnerable to charges of fraudulent practices.
Types of Work at Home Scams
? Assembly Jobs: Involves investing hundreds of dollars to buy instructions and materials to produce crafts and signs for a potential company. After producing the products, the company may refuse to buy your products because it doesn?t meet their standards.
? Multi-Level Marketing (MLM): Requires you to recruit new people to sell a scammer's products or services. You often end up making close to nothing when the direct sales system crashes.
? Stuffing Envelopes: Tricks people into believing they can make $3 or $4 per envelope they stuff. If you apply, you may end up receiving promotional material asking you to buy instructions on how to get rich quick. The instruction will show you how to post similar job ads for stuffing envelopes.
? Online Businesses: Advertises how you can start your own online business and start making money fast. If you apply you will be asked to purchase a pointless guide to work-at-home jobs.
? Processing Claims: Deceives you into thinking that you can make hundreds of dollars a week by processing insurance claims for health care providers. Asks you to pay for training and to buy equipment and software in order to get started.
The best way to protect yourself from work at home scams is by not applying and staying informed of the outcomes. Remember there?s no easy way to make money. Every start up business and career requires hard work, resources, and luck.

The Truth Behind Nigerian Scams
? Emerged in the early 1980s under consecutive governments of Nigeria.
? Constitutes the 3rd to the 5th largest industry in Nigeria.
? May be also referred to as an advanced fee fraud, 419 fraud, The Nigerian Connection, and 419 ? a section of the criminal code of Nigeria
? Authorities often don?t recover the cash raked in from victims.
? Perpetrators are often West Africans, predominantly Nigerians, who work from Nigeria and abroad.
? Nigerian scams remain a confidence fraud, not a cyber crime, tapping into all avenues of communications.
How Nigerian Scams Work
The potential victim of a Nigerian scam receives a letter via spam, fax, or mail. The letter requests the recipient to aid in laundering money out of the country or another illegal job in return for a huge sum of money. Many variations of the Nigerian scam letter exists, but most request a small amount of money to help transfer an incredible amount of wealth in return for a substantial monetary award.
However, if the recipient chooses to pay the upfront fee to help transfer the money. The recipient will often receive another request for a transfer fee with a promise of even more cash. This continues until the recipient runs out of money or the scammer moves on to fresh bait.
Some scammers may even request your personal information, like your bank account or credit card number, so they can transfer the non-existent cash award to you, making it important to know that whenever you give your personal information online or over the phone you open yourself to the possibilities of falling victim to identity theft, credit card fraud, insurance fraud, internet fraud, and more scams. So, take the extra step to protect your personal information and discard Nigerian scam letters and other unsolicited emails, services, and requests.
Recipients of Nigerian Scams
If you receive a Nigerian scam letter through any means of communication, you should do the following:
? Discard the letter and don?t respond
? Post a complaint to the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) or www.ic3.gov/
? File a complaint to the Nigerian Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) at www.efccnigeria.org/, if you?ve lost money
? Write a letter to the email provider of the scammer at the abuse address, if you received the scam through your free email provider. Remember to include the letter you?ve received plus its headers and subject line in the complaint.
http://www.spamlaws.com

Admin

Spring 16.05.2009. 23:24

Are there any online/work from home health care related jobs? Any work from home or online jobs in the field of medicine?

Spring

Admin 16.05.2009. 23:24

This is from the Better Business Bureau:
Recognizing a Work at Home Scam
Avoid falling victim to a work at home scam by recognizing the following warning signs in job advertisements:
? Boasts no experience necessary
? Promises easy money and huge part-time earnings
? Promotes having ?inside? business information
? Asks you to purchase products or instructions before getting ?hired?
Outcomes of a Work at Home Scam
Protect yourself from tempting work-at-home promotions that offer exaggerated benefits by being informed of the outcomes. The outcomes of work at home scams include: a waste of money, time, reputation, and morale.
Victims of work at home scams have reported losses ranging from $10 to $70,000. Although the money loss may be recovered, the countless hours that you spend on unfruitful projects can?t. You may also end up selling nonexistent services and poor products to your customers, making yourself vulnerable to charges of fraudulent practices.
Types of Work at Home Scams
? Assembly Jobs: Involves investing hundreds of dollars to buy instructions and materials to produce crafts and signs for a potential company. After producing the products, the company may refuse to buy your products because it doesn?t meet their standards.
? Multi-Level Marketing (MLM): Requires you to recruit new people to sell a scammer's products or services. You often end up making close to nothing when the direct sales system crashes.
? Stuffing Envelopes: Tricks people into believing they can make $3 or $4 per envelope they stuff. If you apply, you may end up receiving promotional material asking you to buy instructions on how to get rich quick. The instruction will show you how to post similar job ads for stuffing envelopes.
? Online Businesses: Advertises how you can start your own online business and start making money fast. If you apply you will be asked to purchase a pointless guide to work-at-home jobs.
? Processing Claims: Deceives you into thinking that you can make hundreds of dollars a week by processing insurance claims for health care providers. Asks you to pay for training and to buy equipment and software in order to get started.
The best way to protect yourself from work at home scams is by not applying and staying informed of the outcomes. Remember there?s no easy way to make money. Every start up business and career requires hard work, resources, and luck.

The Truth Behind Nigerian Scams
? Emerged in the early 1980s under consecutive governments of Nigeria.
? Constitutes the 3rd to the 5th largest industry in Nigeria.
? May be also referred to as an advanced fee fraud, 419 fraud, The Nigerian Connection, and 419 ? a section of the criminal code of Nigeria
? Authorities often don?t recover the cash raked in from victims.
? Perpetrators are often West Africans, predominantly Nigerians, who work from Nigeria and abroad.
? Nigerian scams remain a confidence fraud, not a cyber crime, tapping into all avenues of communications.
How Nigerian Scams Work
The potential victim of a Nigerian scam receives a letter via spam, fax, or mail. The letter requests the recipient to aid in laundering money out of the country or another illegal job in return for a huge sum of money. Many variations of the Nigerian scam letter exists, but most request a small amount of money to help transfer an incredible amount of wealth in return for a substantial monetary award.
However, if the recipient chooses to pay the upfront fee to help transfer the money. The recipient will often receive another request for a transfer fee with a promise of even more cash. This continues until the recipient runs out of money or the scammer moves on to fresh bait.
Some scammers may even request your personal information, like your bank account or credit card number, so they can transfer the non-existent cash award to you, making it important to know that whenever you give your personal information online or over the phone you open yourself to the possibilities of falling victim to identity theft, credit card fraud, insurance fraud, internet fraud, and more scams. So, take the extra step to protect your personal information and discard Nigerian scam letters and other unsolicited emails, services, and requests.
Recipients of Nigerian Scams
If you receive a Nigerian scam letter through any means of communication, you should do the following:
? Discard the letter and don?t respond
? Post a complaint to the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) or www.ic3.gov/
? File a complaint to the Nigerian Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) at www.efccnigeria.org/, if you?ve lost money
? Write a letter to the email provider of the scammer at the abuse address, if you received the scam through your free email provider. Remember to include the letter you?ve received plus its headers and subject line in the complaint.
http://www.spamlaws.com

Admin

Susan Z 01.11.2008. 19:29

Has anyone ever been scamed by Clearview Lending in Florida?
My contact was Jim Foster. I'm glad i started this thread, spread the word they are a scam. Can we contact the BBB?

Susan Z

Admin 01.11.2008. 19:29

This is a total fraud and scam, I have contacted and BBB, Attorney Generals office and Money Gram. Please do not fall for this, I have talked to Jamie Davenport, Glen Russel, and then Jim Foster. Please do not be another victim of this company.

Go to these websites also and report these guys.

Participating Better Business Bureaus (BBBs)
The Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3)
Phonebusters
The US Postal Inspection Service (USPIS)
The National Fraud Information Center (NFIC)
The Identity Theft Assistance Center (ITAC)

OK, as they are ignoring my calls here is my whole story. I wish I could reply back to other people that have posted but I can't figure it out so I will just keep posting in this spot by editing the original post.

I was contacted by Jamie Davenport Clear View Lending Services about a loan of $5000.00 I applied for with them. He explained to me they deal with big investors and they have the $5000.00 in an account for me. In his words "I checked the account myself and the funds are there." To start the process they need me to sign their contract along with two pay stubs and front and back of my drivers license. Along with all of this they also needed an upfront security deposit since my credit isn't very good. I then proceeded to send $860 on 10/20 via MoneyGram(ref#40137081) with a $60 filing fee for a total of $920 to Angela Zimmerman in Pine Falls Canada to cover the upfront cost which they called a security deposit to lock in the loan. I asked why $860 and they said it is for the first two months of payments. They said I should receive the loan of $5000.00 the following day via direct deposit in my bank account which I supplied to them. On 10/21 Glen Russell called and said the investor needed another two months payments because the loan was reassessed. I didn't have the funds they request which was another $860 but I had $580 and they guaranteed the funds to be in my account the next day. After I sent the $580 + 14.16 via MoneyGram(ref#87250393) to Angela Zimmerman in Pine Falls Canada(this is where I sent the $860 to also) they said the funds would be in my bank account on 10/22. On 10/22 I talked to Jim Foster who is their Executive Manager, he said the investor didn't live up to their end of the contract so they will give me back my funds on 11/19 which is the lenders next billing date, he also said as a courtesy of Clear View Lending Services they would give me $500.00 for all my troubles. I then proceeded to check out all scams on the internet and called MoneyGram about Angela Zimmerman. MoneyGram told me Angela Zimmerman didn't pick up the funds in Pine Falls Manitoba Canada but in Toronto, Ontario Canada. I told MoneyGram the situation and they have taken precautions on their side to prevent her from scamming other people. The next day I talked to Jim Foster again and told him what MoneyGram told about Ms. Zimmerman picking up the funds in another location, he insisted MoneyGram made a mistake. I asked this question two times and he repeated to me that they made a mistake in telling me she picked up the funds in Toronto. The next step I took was to call Florida Banking and Finance Department to see if this is an accutal company and they said they have no record of Clear View Lending Services. After I drafted a letter to Clear View Lending Services(which I will fax to you also) to ask for their license number and which state they file taxes in, they faxed me a letter stating I will receive my funds 11/14 instead of 11/19. I know 11/14 or 11/19 has not come yet but I know this will never come true without assistance from a governing body. Can you please help me out in this situation? I am now seeing other people getting scammed on this.

EVREYONE PLEASE TELL MONEY GRAM OR THE METHOD THEY ARE USING TO SEND MONEY, because they can link it back to these guys faster. This way they catch the person getting your money also!!

Admin

Samantha A 05.08.2007. 20:09

once you pay an outstanding debt, how long before it comes off your credit report ? Can you call Experian directly and fax proof of a debt being paid in full in hopes of it coming off ( or showing as a paid debt ) sooner ?
I want to rent an apartment but a bad debt from the past is stopping me. I paid the debit but the new apartment company wants to see it reflected in the credit report and not excepting the letter and reciept proving I paid the debit in full.

What can I do to hurry this process up ???

Samantha A

Admin 05.08.2007. 20:09

Usually creditors update with credit bureaus once a month (usually the begining of the month), so if you paid sometime this last week it will not show as paid on your credit report until September most likely. Sending the info to Exeprian yourself will likely not get it done any faster.

Unless you negotiated the removal of the debt when you paid the item off it will not actually be removed from your credit report for 7 years. It will show as Settlement Paid if you didn't negotiate anything else with the collections bureau.

http://www.creditinfocenter.com/rebuild/

Admin

Francisco 21.05.2009. 01:00

How can I find an online jo? Well I'm working at this place where you have to unload containers, and its too much for me. I heard online jobs might work, but I looked at some of them and some of them you have to pay to. So I don't know what other place iss free. =]

Francisco

Admin 21.05.2009. 01:00

if they weren't scams, we would all be doing it and we would all be rich!
This is from the Better Business Bureau:
Recognizing a Work at Home Scam
Avoid falling victim to a work at home scam by recognizing the following warning signs in job advertisements:
? Boasts no experience necessary
? Promises easy money and huge part-time earnings
? Promotes having ?inside? business information
? Asks you to purchase products or instructions before getting ?hired?
Outcomes of a Work at Home Scam
Protect yourself from tempting work-at-home promotions that offer exaggerated benefits by being informed of the outcomes. The outcomes of work at home scams include: a waste of money, time, reputation, and morale.
Victims of work at home scams have reported losses ranging from $10 to $70,000. Although the money loss may be recovered, the countless hours that you spend on unfruitful projects can?t. You may also end up selling nonexistent services and poor products to your customers, making yourself vulnerable to charges of fraudulent practices.
Types of Work at Home Scams
? Assembly Jobs: Involves investing hundreds of dollars to buy instructions and materials to produce crafts and signs for a potential company. After producing the products, the company may refuse to buy your products because it doesn?t meet their standards.
? Multi-Level Marketing (MLM): Requires you to recruit new people to sell a scammer's products or services. You often end up making close to nothing when the direct sales system crashes.
? Stuffing Envelopes: Tricks people into believing they can make $3 or $4 per envelope they stuff. If you apply, you may end up receiving promotional material asking you to buy instructions on how to get rich quick. The instruction will show you how to post similar job ads for stuffing envelopes.
? Online Businesses: Advertises how you can start your own online business and start making money fast. If you apply you will be asked to purchase a pointless guide to work-at-home jobs.
? Processing Claims: Deceives you into thinking that you can make hundreds of dollars a week by processing insurance claims for health care providers. Asks you to pay for training and to buy equipment and software in order to get started.
The best way to protect yourself from work at home scams is by not applying and staying informed of the outcomes. Remember there?s no easy way to make money. Every start up business and career requires hard work, resources, and luck.

The Truth Behind Nigerian Scams
? Emerged in the early 1980s under consecutive governments of Nigeria.
? Constitutes the 3rd to the 5th largest industry in Nigeria.
? May be also referred to as an advanced fee fraud, 419 fraud, The Nigerian Connection, and 419 ? a section of the criminal code of Nigeria
? Authorities often don?t recover the cash raked in from victims.
? Perpetrators are often West Africans, predominantly Nigerians, who work from Nigeria and abroad.
? Nigerian scams remain a confidence fraud, not a cyber crime, tapping into all avenues of communications.
How Nigerian Scams Work
The potential victim of a Nigerian scam receives a letter via spam, fax, or mail. The letter requests the recipient to aid in laundering money out of the country or another illegal job in return for a huge sum of money. Many variations of the Nigerian scam letter exists, but most request a small amount of money to help transfer an incredible amount of wealth in return for a substantial monetary award.
However, if the recipient chooses to pay the upfront fee to help transfer the money. The recipient will often receive another request for a transfer fee with a promise of even more cash. This continues until the recipient runs out of money or the scammer moves on to fresh bait.
Some scammers may even request your personal information, like your bank account or credit card number, so they can transfer the non-existent cash award to you, making it important to know that whenever you give your personal information online or over the phone you open yourself to the possibilities of falling victim to identity theft, credit card fraud, insurance fraud, internet fraud, and more scams. So, take the extra step to protect your personal information and discard Nigerian scam letters and other unsolicited emails, services, and requests.
Recipients of Nigerian Scams
If you receive a Nigerian scam letter through any means of communication, you should do the following:
? Discard the letter and don?t respond
? Post a complaint to the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) or www.ic3.gov/
? File a complaint to the Nigerian Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) at www.efccnigeria.org/, if you?ve lost money
? Write a letter to the email provider of the scammer at the abuse address, if you received the scam through your free email provider. Remember to include the letter you?ve received plus its headers and subject line in the complaint.
http://www.spamla

Admin

foxymoron 01.10.2007. 19:25

I received a call from my credit card company today stating that I didnt pay my bill. I did pay my bill!? I went online and found my bank statement saying the bill posted 9/13. I faxed this to them and they said its going to be 2 months before they can fix it. It the meantime they want me to pay late fees, on top of over my balance fees (which they said they will recredit, HA). I stated to them I am not paying anything until they straighten this out... What can I do to resolve this faster? and keep it off my credit?

foxymoron

Admin 01.10.2007. 19:25

There is nothing you can do to keep them from turning you into the credit bureau as a "slow (or) no pay" account if you refuse to pay what they say you owe. Your best bet... and I know it sucks... is to pay what the charges and keep the best records you have ever kept so that you can continue to dispute the charges and "eventually" you will get your money back.

Admin

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