The 10-Step Resume Critique

Comments (16)


The 10-Step Resume Critique

By: Peter Hill, CPRW

Your resume will generally receive a 15- to 30-second scan upon first review by an employer. With that in mind, it is critical that your resume -- your "paper handshake" -- makes a positive first impression and compels the reader to put your resume in the "yes" pile and possibly call you in for an interview.

Before you circulate your resume, you will want to ensure it incorporates the basic characteristics of a powerful, interview-generating resume. When evaluating your resume you can follow the same basic steps as professional resume writers. This will increase the chances not only of having it placed into that "yes" pile, but also of helping it rise to the top of the stack.

STEP 1: Ask yourself, "Is my resume in the correct format to best showcase my career history?"

Is your resume the appropriate length, format, and formality for the position you are targeting?

Length: For someone with five or more years of experience, a resume will typically be one to two pages. It isn't at all uncommon for executive-level resumes to be as long as three or four pages. If you are a recent college graduate one page may suffice, but don't be afraid to go two pages, particularly if you have some work, internship, or volunteer experience under your belt.

Format: There are three common types of resumes: chronological, functional, and combination. A chronological resume calls attention to your employment history in reverse chronological order. It is most effective when your job listings are notable (position titles and/or company names) and are directly relevant to the job target.

A functional resume de-emphasizes positions, job descriptions, and employment dates. It organizes qualifications by related skills or experience. Job seekers who have gaps in employment or who are making a career change commonly use functional resumes. Think carefully before using this format as feedback from hiring authorities suggests that they don't like them -- they know that functional resumes can be used to minimize, or even hide, periods of unemployment and other flaws in your history.

A typical combination resume is just that -- a blend of the other two formats. It begins with a powerful Qualifications Summary or Professional Profile that clearly communicates your functional skills. This allows your resume to be focused toward particular positions and/or industries, and provides a platform to communicate the your best qualifications. A reverse-chronological listing of employment experience (including responsibilities and, more importantly, relevant accomplishments) follows. The combination format is a popular choice among professional resume writers as it is particularly effective in selling their clients to employers.

A fourth type of resume, which won't be discussed at length here, is the Curriculum Vita. A "CV" is a conservatively written and designed document that emphasizes educational credentials, academic research and projects, publications, presentations, awards, and honors. This format is typically used in scholastic, medical, and scientific fields.

Formality: A good rule of thumb is to write using the same level of language that you would be expected to use in the job you are targeting. An entry-level resume can include brief sentences. If you are a manager or executive your resume will be more narrative -- to draw a complete picture of your career successes and contributions -- and include vernacular expected at your level of accountability.

STEP 2: Ask yourself, "Is my resume visually appealing and easy to read?"

Have you incorporated appropriate font type and size selections throughout your resume? Depending on the font choice, the size should fall somewhere between 9 and 11 point, 12 point at most. Section headings can be larger, of course. As for font type, the higher your level of responsibility, the more likely it is that you will use a serif font (such as Times New Roman, Garamond, or Palatino). It is acceptable to combine fonts, but never more than two (for example, Times for the section titles and Arial for the content).

Does your resume contain sufficient white space? Your challenge is to draw the reader's attention to essential information. Using white space effectively can help you do just that. You'll need to become familiar with some features of your word processing software that you might not normally access (such as the paragraph, line-spacing, and tab settings).

Does your resume implement appropriate design elements? Conservative use of lines, bolding, italics, and bullets can be very effective. When used consistently, they will help the reader along in your thought process and crystallize the organization of your resume.

For great ideas on contemporary formats, check out one or more of the recently released resume resource books at your local bookstore. One of the best out there is Resume Magic--Trade Secrets of a Professional Resume Writer by Susan Britton Whitcomb (JIST Works). For executive-level ideas, Wendy Enelow's Best Resumes for $100,000+ Jobs (Impact Publications) or Donald Asher's Bible of Executive Resumes (Ten Speed Press) are both outstanding.

STEP 3: Ask yourself, "Does my resume contain a powerful opening section that draws the reader in?"

Is the most relevant information you want to communicate showcased in a powerful Qualifications Summary or Professional Profile in the top 1/3 of your resume? At a minimum, you'll want to include your total years of experience and encapsulate your core competencies and related hard and soft skills. Keep in mind that the remainder of your resume must substantiate what you include in this section.

Does your resume make clear what position, industry, or career you are targeting? Employers don't have time to guess what you want to be when you grow up.

Step 4: Ask yourself, "Does my resume effectively communicate my value to the prospective employer in one or more of the following ways?"

Does your resume demonstrate how you can help an employer make money? Save money or time? Solve a specific problem? Make work easier? Build relationships? Be more competitive? Attract new customers? Retain existing customers?

Regardless of your level of accountability or industry these are things that all organizations want their employees to help them accomplish. Communicate your abilities to contribute in one or more of the areas mentioned and employers will want to talk with you.

Step 5: Ask yourself, "Does my resume contain powerful, concise, accomplishment-oriented writing designed to increase the reader's interest and stimulate a request for a job interview?"

Is your entire resume targeted? Does it support your job or career goal? Does it speak the reader's language with relevant industry-specific keywords? Did you use persuasive, high-impact statements that sell your qualifications as a superior candidate? Does your resume include specific accomplishments that highlight challenges, action taken, and results (quantifiable, if possible)?

Most importantly, do the accomplishments support your target? In other words, do they represent observable behaviors that are associated with the best in your field?

Step 6: Ask yourself, "Is irrelevant information excluded?"

There is no need to include any of the following: personal information (e.g. marital status and age), full address of employers (city and state is sufficient), personal pronouns ("I", "He" or "She"), reasons for leaving jobs, reference information, and unrelated hobbies or interests.

Step 7: Ask yourself, "Does my resume present relevant content in an organized fashion?"

As a general rule, you'll only need to cover the last 10 years of employment in detail, 15 years at the most. Anything prior can be summarized, but do attempt to keep the information relevant and accomplishment oriented.

Are your employment dates presented appropriately? There is no need to get specific -- months and years are sufficient in most cases.

Did you include more than one source of contact information? At a minimum, list your home phone number and e-mail address. By the way, if you don't have an e-mail address, get one...now! Listing it on your resume tells employers that you are technologically savvy.

Is your experience arranged in reverse chronological order? Are all other sections of your resume applicable to the types of positions you are pursuing?

STEP 8: Ask yourself, "Is my resume free of spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammatical, and syntax errors?"

Feedback from hiring authorities is unanimous -- a resume with errors is likely to be immediately discounted. They assume that your performance on the job will be sloppy and that you don't pay attention to details. Proofread your resume. Ask a friend or colleague to proofread your resume. Ask your mother to proofread your resume.

Step 9: Repeat step 8.)

Step 10: Repeat step 8 again!

Your resume is a material representation of you. It is a marketing document -- not a simple work history -- that tells organizations how you can contribute to their success. Ask yourself the questions above as you review your self-written resume. If you've covered everything, you are well on your way to getting companies interested in you.

Copyright 2004 Peter Hill, CPRW -- Honolulu, Hawaii, U.S.A.

About The Author

Peter Hill is a Certified Professional Resume Writer. He owns and operates Distincitive Resumes, a Honolulu-based consultancy for managers and executives. Peter can be contacted via his website, http://www.peterhill.biz.


distinctiveresumes@yahoo.com

Comments

Alice 15.11.2009. 02:27

How do you get a book published? I know there are alot of steps and I have yet to know what they are. Help?

Alice

Admin 15.11.2009. 02:27

Nowadays there are publishing companies that will put your book in print in either a hardback or soft cover for your own personal use, but you will be footing the bill.

This is what I have found if you wish to have a book published professionally. These are the steps most people go through to get an agent, get an editor, and get published.

1. Write the book.
2. Find a list of agents who might be interested in representing your work.
3. Write and mail your query letters.
4. Wait while the agents receive the query, then consider your work, your resume, your potential readership, the current market, etc.
5. Repeat steps 3 through 5 as often as necessary until you really do get an agent.

6. Get your finalized manuscript to your agent.
7. Wait while your agent reads your manuscript.
8. Wait while your agent writes up the critique of what needs to be fixed before he can present your work to a publisher.
9. Incorporate the changes your agent requests.
10. Send the rewritten manuscript to your agent.
11. Wait for your agent to reread and accept your manuscript as ready for presentation to a publisher.

12. Wait while your agent copies and sends the manuscript to a prospective publisher.
13. Wait while the assistant to the assistant to the junior to the senior editor reads your manuscript. If this editor likes the manuscript. she will pass it along to the next editor in the line. If she doesn't like it, she will reject it and send it back to your agent. At which point, your agent repeats step 12.
14. Wait while the assistant to the junior to the senior editor reads your manuscript. If this editor likes your work, he will pass it along. If he doesn't like the story, he will reject it...
15. Wait while the junior to the senior editor reads your manuscript. If this editor likes your work....
16. Wait while the senior editor reads your manuscript...
17. Wait while the editors argue for taking on yet another unknown author to the higher-up powers-that-be in the publishing house.
18. Repeat steps 12 through 17 as often as necessary until you have been offered a book contract by a publisher.

19. Wait while your agent negotiates a contract with the publisher.

20. Wait while the publisher gets the manuscript critique to you, including requests for changes.
21. Rewrite your manuscript, fixing all the problems identified by the publisher.
22. Send your rewritten manuscript back to your agent (or publisher) by the due date.
23. Wait while your agent hands the manuscript to the publisher and tells them again how wonderful you are.
24. Wait while your editor reads the rewrite and makes the second set of change requests.
25. Pray that the publisher doesn't change editorial management, and that your editor doesn't leave the publishing house. (If your editor leaves that publishing house for another house, it's quite possible that your new editor won't like your work at all and will request extensive revisions in a completely different vein than that which the first editor requested.)
26. Rewrite the manuscript again, to incorporate the second (and hopefully final) set of changes requested by your editor.
27. Send the final draft off to your agent by the due date.
28. Wait while your agent reads the manuscript, then takes it in person to your editor and reminds them again how wonderful you are.
29. Repeat steps 20 through 28 as often as necessary until your publisher can't find anything else wrong with the manuscript.

30. Wait while the manuscript goes through its final story edit.
31. Wait while the manuscript goes through the line or copy edit.
32. Wait while the manuscript goes into production.

33. Receive the galleys and check them carefully!
34. Send the galleys back to the publisher ASAP.
35. Wait while your corrections are incorporated into the typeset book.

36. Wait while the book is printed.
37. Wait while the printed book is warehoused (one to two months).
38. Wait while the warehoused stock is distributed (yet another month).
39. Wait the final weeks until you see it on the shelves of your own local bookstores.

If you have survived the process to this point, you are now a published author. Congratulations!

...and people wonder why it takes so long to get into print.

Good luck!

Admin

priya 06.02.2007. 14:10

how to prepare resume? I want to prepare a resume of a fresher. can any one suggest me what are the things to be added in it? and a sample resume for M.B.A with dual specilization in HR & FINANCE. so a sample resume can make me clear

priya

Admin 06.02.2007. 14:10

Resume Essentials
Before you write, take time to do a self-assessment on paper. Outline your skills and abilities as well as your work
experience, hobbies, and volunteer activities. This will make it easier to prepare a thorough resume.
2. The Content of Your Resume
Centered at the top of the page
- Name
- Address
- Home telephone and cell number
- Email address
- Website address
Flush Left
- Social Security Number
- Veteran?s Preference
- Highest Grade
- Vacancy Announcement Number
- Job Title, Series, and Grade
All your contact information should go at the top of your resume.
Avoid nicknames.
Use a permanent address. Use your parents? address, a friend?s address, or the address you plan to use
after graduation.
Use a permanent telephone number and include the area code. If you have an answering machine, record
a neutral greeting.
Add your email address. Many employers will find it useful (note: Choose an email address that sounds
professional).
Include your web site address only if the web page reflects your professional ambitions.
Objective or Summary
An objective tells potential employers the sort of work you?re hoping to do.
Tailor your objective to the job you want. For example: Equipment Repair and Maintenance Worker, WG-
04749-10, USPH, Announcement Number: OS-11-436
Work Experience
Briefly give the employer an overview of work that has taught you skills. Use action words to describe your job
duties. Include your work experience in reverse chronological order-that is, put your most recent job first and work
backward to your first relevant job. Include:
Name of organization
Position, Grade, Series, Level
Dates of employment
Describe your work responsibilities with emphasis on specific skills and achievements.
Education
Education information is usually the last item on a resume. However, new graduates without a lot of work experience
should list their educational information first.
Your most recent educational information is listed first.
Include your degree (High school diploma, A.S., B.S., B.A., etc.) major, institution attended, minor/
concentration.
Add your grade point average (GPA) if it is higher than 3.0.
Page 2
Mention academic honors.
Other Information
A staff member or your Career Specialist in the Transition Center can advise you on other information to add to your
resume. You may want to add:
Key competencies or special skills
Leadership experience in volunteer organizations
Participation in sports
3. Resume Checkup
After you?ve written your resume, it?s time to have it reviewed and critiqued by a Career Specialist. You can also take
the following steps to ensure quality:
Content
- Run a spell check on your computer before anyone sees your resume.
- Get a friend (an English major would do nicely) to do a grammar review.
- Ask another friend to proofread. The more people who see your resume, the more likely -that misspelled
words and awkward phrases will be seen (and corrected).
Design
These tips will make your resume easier to read and/ or scan into an employer?s data base.
- Use white or off-white paper
- Use 8-1/2 X 11-inch paper
- Print on one side of the paper
- Use a font size of 10 to 14 points
- Use non-decorative typefaces
- Choose one typeface and stick to it
- Avoid italics, script, and underlined words
- Do not use horizontal or vertical lines, graphics, or shading
- Do not fold or staple your resume

Admin

Absterbabe!!! 27.11.2011. 19:05

How to make a resume for someone who doesn't have any job experience? I'm currently looking for work, and getting more and more frustrated by the day. I have no previous job experience, graduated from high school, got a 120-hour certification from Penn Foster Online for a Child Development associate. I have been an in-home nanny/housekeeper for the last 2 years, but have not gotten paid regularly. I have no clue how I would put a resume together, and even if I should...I have tried making one online, but it doesn't come in word format, and I cannot make one on Word since I cannot afford to buy a full version of Microsoft office. For those of you who have experience in making resumes and finding a job, I need some advice, I have an account through snagajob, but nothing promising in my area. I've applied online at a couple of places, called them several times to see if there was still a position available, but have heard nothing back. I know the economy is bad and its difficult to find entry level jobs, but I need help. Any advice?

Absterbabe!!!

Admin 27.11.2011. 19:05

First a above average resume will at least get you a phone or in person interview. It is like dating if you are attractive and well groomed the person will approach you same with resumes. Below are some steps you may decide to take to improve your chances of landing a job interview and hopefully a job.

1) Workforce Development Center : This center is thru the unemployment office in your area/state just contact them or go in person to attend the courses on : resume writing/cover letters, interviewing and basic computer skills. They will critique your resume. However you need to start documenting your skills, jobs either on a piece of paper and go to your local library to use their computers. The Workforce Development Center have computers with the full version Microsoft Office i.e. 2003 and 2007. I would put my resume on 2007.

2) Start obtaining references from past jobs i.e. full name, address/zip code, phone # cell or home etc. You need to have a typed separate Word document page for 2 personal references and 3 professional references. Please ask these references will they agree to be a references relative to your i.e. stability, dedication, good or excellent child care etc.

Since you worked as a in-home nanny/housekeeper you should list the skills the will be applicable to your job as Child Development Associate on your resume for example:

Nannies are expected to participate in the social, emotional, and intellectual development of their charges, and will work with the child(ren) on such areas a language development, potty training, social manners, homework, and more. Many candidates for nanny positions have held previous employment as CDAs (Child Development Associate) . Are you patient? Can you handle 8-10 hours on a stretch with a small child, perhaps with no other adult companionship? Are you reliable and trustworthy?
Are you flexible enough to perform your childcare responsibilities according to the family's rules?
Are you a self-starter with initiative who can organize his/her day to accomplish all required tasks, while not neglecting your charge(s)?
With children, things do not always go according to plan. Are you adaptable and flexible enough to change your routine to accommodate the sick child, for example, or the lost sneakers when you are on a deadline, without becoming upset?

Nanny HousekeeperPrimary Functions: The nanny/housekeeper has the dual responsibilities for the care of a family's children and their home. The nanny/housekeeper typically works in an environment where the family's children spend significant time daily out of the home, generally at school. The nanny/housekeeper's childcare responsibilities include full supervision of children while they are in the home, atA nanny/housekeeper may work eight to ten hours per day, generally five days per week.

The nanny/housekeeper works under the minimal supervision of the family (adult members) and must be a self-starter, show sound judgement, be committed to the well-being of children, and be able to take initiative, attention to their meals, dressing, and hygiene.

Admin

babar s 27.01.2007. 06:12

how to prepare an effective resume ? hi i am doing PGDBA from secunderabad and now i have to send my resume to various companies for doing summer project.
i am having an experience in multi level marketing of about two years . i ahave also worked with some domestic and international call centers both in lucknow and delhi . but i don't know whether to include all these things in my resume or not?
can anybody please help me in this regard?

babar s

Admin 27.01.2007. 06:12

Resume Essentials
Before you write, take time to do a self-assessment on paper. Outline your skills and abilities as well as your work
experience, hobbies, and volunteer activities. This will make it easier to prepare a thorough resume.
2. The Content of Your Resume
Centered at the top of the page
- Name
- Address
- Home telephone and cell number
- Email address
- Website address
Flush Left
- Social Security Number
- Veteran?s Preference
- Highest Grade
- Vacancy Announcement Number
- Job Title, Series, and Grade
All your contact information should go at the top of your resume.
Avoid nicknames.
Use a permanent address. Use your parents? address, a friend?s address, or the address you plan to use
after graduation.
Use a permanent telephone number and include the area code. If you have an answering machine, record
a neutral greeting.
Add your email address. Many employers will find it useful (note: Choose an email address that sounds
professional).
Include your web site address only if the web page reflects your professional ambitions.
Objective or Summary
An objective tells potential employers the sort of work you?re hoping to do.
Tailor your objective to the job you want. For example: Equipment Repair and Maintenance Worker, WG-
04749-10, USPH, Announcement Number: OS-11-436
Work Experience
Briefly give the employer an overview of work that has taught you skills. Use action words to describe your job
duties. Include your work experience in reverse chronological order-that is, put your most recent job first and work
backward to your first relevant job. Include:
Name of organization
Position, Grade, Series, Level
Dates of employment
Describe your work responsibilities with emphasis on specific skills and achievements.
Education
Education information is usually the last item on a resume. However, new graduates without a lot of work experience
should list their educational information first.
Your most recent educational information is listed first.
Include your degree (High school diploma, A.S., B.S., B.A., etc.) major, institution attended, minor/
concentration.
Add your grade point average (GPA) if it is higher than 3.0.
Page 2
Mention academic honors.
Other Information
A staff member or your Career Specialist in the Transition Center can advise you on other information to add to your
resume. You may want to add:
Key competencies or special skills
Leadership experience in volunteer organizations
Participation in sports
3. Resume Checkup
After you?ve written your resume, it?s time to have it reviewed and critiqued by a Career Specialist. You can also take
the following steps to ensure quality:
Content
- Run a spell check on your computer before anyone sees your resume.
- Get a friend (an English major would do nicely) to do a grammar review.
- Ask another friend to proofread. The more people who see your resume, the more likely -that misspelled
words and awkward phrases will be seen (and corrected).
Design
These tips will make your resume easier to read and/ or scan into an employer?s data base.
- Use white or off-white paper
- Use 8-1/2 X 11-inch paper
- Print on one side of the paper
- Use a font size of 10 to 14 points
- Use non-decorative typefaces
- Choose one typeface and stick to it
- Avoid italics, script, and underlined words
- Do not use horizontal or vertical lines, graphics, or shading
- Do not fold or staple your resume
hope this helps

Admin

Zombiecakes 17.05.2011. 06:33

Could I get some critique on this a short story? (Please be as harsh as you feel is necessary.)

- - - - - - -

The corner of the sloshing gas can left a trail in the dirt as Addie struggled to drag it along the side of the road. She leaned to one side with the weight of the thing, puffing and gasping for breath. It was too hot for this kind of work, and she was too small to do it; if Chuck hadn?t been such a dumbass and broken his arm on their last hunt, he?d have been the one lugging the thing two miles down the road to the petrol-starved station wagon, and she would be the one sitting on the roof with a double-barreled shotgun, ammunition, and copious amounts of beef jerky. Addie was the better shot, between the two of them, and Chuck had an uncontrollable twitch in his trigger finger. He wasted ammo like none other.

This wouldn?t have been such a problem, if there were fewer zombies and more ammunition stockpiles in whatever backwoods cesspool they were now wandering through. Addie had lost the map a few days back.

Addie set the gas can down and wiped sweat from her brow with one hand while the other went, not so much out of instinct as out of trained paranoia, to the pistol shoved between her blue jeans and belt. She was not about to let some shambling horror get the best of her.

That would just be embarrassing.

Before The Event, Addie had never given much thought to just how pathetic it really was to go down victim to a decaying corpse that walked slower than the average granny on a leisurely stroll. Since then, she?d had plenty of time to think on it.

Her conclusion? Lamest shit ever.

She hefted the can and resumed her trek back to the car, where Chuck had undoubtedly eaten the last of the beef jerky, the bastard. Every time Addie thought about Chuck, she had to remind herself about the joke where a bear is chasing two people and how you don?t have to be faster than the bear, just faster than the other guy. Chuck was undoubtedly The Other Guy.

Addie?s calves and arms shrieked in utter agony as she lugged herself and the gas can up the final hill between herself and Chuck and, more importantly, Chuck?s station wagon.

From the high ground, she saw them. Seven moaning zombies, banging listlessly but relentlessly at the car with poor, stupid Chuck trapped inside, probably wetting himself in terror. The idiot had even left the shot-gun outside of the car. Addie remembered the joke about the bear, but dropped the gas can and whipped out her pistol. Chuck was the only living person she?d seen for at least a week, and she wasn?t going to let him become the next meal for the cannibalistic freaks surrounding him.

She took aim calmly, certain the zombies hadn?t noticed her yet. They were an awfully single-minded lot. Addie nearly knocked herself in the head with the recoil from her shot, but by some miracle, she managed to get a headshot on the first zombie.

With an awful wail, they turned to face her. She guessed they wanted a snack they wouldn?t need the jaws of life to get at. With trembling arms, she took another shot. This time, her luck wasn?t so good. This time, she remembered her only weapon was a six-shooter and she?d already fired twice and there were still six zombies left.

?Shit!? she shouted, and took off at a sprint.

She knew she was faster than the bear.

She thought she heard Chuck scream in rage from inside the empty-tanked station wagon.

She was also faster than the other guy.

Zombiecakes

Admin 17.05.2011. 06:33

Overall, good.

Grammar: perfect, except for the stars. I understand if you did that for Yahoo answers sake, but if you plan to publish the story or enter it into any contests, no stars.

Story: You might want to introduce the zombies a bit earlier and see if you can describe Addie a bit more thoroughly. When I started reading, the first thing I thought of with a girl struggling to carry a can of gas was a little girl, 10 or so, cursing at her step-dad or something. Then BAM! Zombie apocalypse. Addie as a character also has some discontinuities. She is small (which implies weak) but is a better shot than a grown man and survival-oriented? For a short story, she seems to have a bit too much depth. If you were going to lengthen this, you could explain that as being part of her upbringing or something, but otherwise she makes the story a bt hard to follow. Also, clarify the POV. Is this from Addie's POV? Is she thinking of herself in third person? Or is the story simply being told from third person? If it's the latter, then clarify her direct thoughts by italicizing them or through punctuation.

Lastly, She just said she was a perfect shot. She had a pistol, the zombies weren't even coming at her, she had time to pull it out and take a breath and level it, and she almost hits herself in the head from the recoil? And 'By some miracle' she managed to shoot the zombie? Is it just me, or is her self-perception a bit off?

You could keep the same ending by changing the beginning. Maybe she starts off by dropping the can, shooting a zombie, then running to check on Chuck to make sure he was alright? That might increase the tension also. That way, she's already used up a bullet and realizes only after she shoots the Zombie in the head that she have enough to take them all out because of that zombie she shot earlier. Hope this helps!

Admin

Bumbaclaut 05.01.2013. 09:41

I don't see the point in school, college or anything in that category? Honestly, i don't see the point in college for a person like my self. Throughout my childhood, i never put more than 60% into school. All i did throughout class was draw. I drew on the desks, carpet or w.e was infron't of me in the moment since kindergarten and got in trouble. When i had class work, i drew over it. That habit followed me straight to highschool. I've always thought school was pointless. Im learning things which i don't care about.. even throughout highschool, i've never studied for one test, and in my grade 12 year i had 127 lates with 95 absences. How did i pass and graduate ontime? I do not know.. The only thing that interests me seemingly is art.. I love to draw and i love anime, im confident in my skills and i wish to improve... So that brought me into taking fine arts for college. currently im a first year, and semester one just finished. Honestly, even though i love drawing, creating and painting(sometimes) I still feel as if i'm forced to do something which i don't want to do. I absolute hate the class. I don't seem to care about my grades. For my finals in art history, I did not want to study so I chose to cheat, and aced the test (my methods of cheating never fails) and for english, i barely went to class, but i passed. I was placed in 160 lvl english which means i have to take 170 next semester. And the only reason why i got placed in the lower level was because on the assessment test which you have to do to determine your level i got a retarded essay question about bonds... I ended up writing about Naruto, and stopped halfway through and stopped.... But yah, I cant seem to please my self and i'm ready to drop the course asap.
I think I'd rather just do a part time job and live on my own in an apartment and work to become a author/graphic novelist on my own. Or i could just go to jail, get a life sentence..... Im joking, relax.

But minus that whole me being lazy factor. I do have a dream, and that to become the best writer/story teller of all time and have my stories/series come to life competing with the top people such as Joanne Rowling (that lady who wrote harry potter), Kishimoto (the creator of naruto) Oda, Hayao Miyazaki (hes a legend in my eyes, google him), ect.

I'm a humble, easygoing person who loves to laugh and i legit don't get angry. I can have a clear state of mind throughout any situation and i dont care about alot of things. My friends say im quick minded and a strategist, but super lazy and does nothing but draw. That's only because i was almost undefeated in chess throughout highschool. Only one person matched me and that was this honor roll student of a nerd. I get along with everyone, weather the crowd is good, or bad. But i stick to the bad crowd.. Don't judge me.. And thats only because i feel more comfortable with them.

But yah. My whole point is, I really dont know what to do with my self. Life its self revolves around a stupid piece of paper (diploma) which is stupid.. I swear this is why people resort to illegal activities.
i swear i have ADHD or w.e you call it.. I didnt even want to proof read this. I read quarter way through and stopped.. lmao, im hopeless i swear.
I honestly hope my mindset changes when i hit my twenties.
I think I should point this out since some people misunderstood my lazyness issue... When it comes to writing a topic on what I want to write about, I can admit my self that the stuff I write is pretty good. My teachers commented about my writing when it came to story telling. They simply adored it. I love writing stories and reading/hearing stories. Even though I dislike writing and everything else, it came to story telling, i get zoned out in my own world. I even tend to so my friends assignments for anything related to creating... I understand the importance in education, I'm not stupid. I know I'm smart, but nothing interests me. I don't care about who died for me in the past or who created what. I only care about my peers and what they've done in life... And judging my writing skills based off this question.. lol.

Bumbaclaut

Admin 05.01.2013. 09:41

My friend's first job out of design school was at Marvel comics,

Could my friend have gotten that job at Marvel without school, I doubt it. She worked her butt off at school, the school really helped mentor her bring up her skills and train her eye. They built these projects for her to put in her portfolio, edited her every step of the way and really helped her develop. She went to a brand name school so it looked good on her resume. Everything she needed the school mapped it out for her.

We went to the same school together and i had to drop out my 2nd year because i couldn't afford it. I bawled my eyes out. Ever since i taught myself how to use these computer programs you need in the industry, looked for my own mentors, internships and connections. And I've had little success.


Honestly, its kind of frustrating to see your post because I worked my butt off at school to get myself to classes & do the homework, never slept, lived in a livingroom so that I could afford rent, worked full time while i was schooling fulltime and got myself in ALOT of debt. Every semester my heart was breaking more and more because I always needed to scramble around for the extra couple of thousands of dollars my loans couldn't cover. My heart was seriously broken, I was lost and i thought i was going to die. And You're complaining about an education that you're fortunate to have, that I killed myself over. where it's going to give you way more opportunities than I've ever had.

Building and creating my own projects for portfolios, editing it without the guidance of a mentor is really difficult. Its alot easier at school when everyone's help you with their critiques. Doing all this while you're trying to pay for rent just delays the process even longer because you have much less time and energy to work on your own projects.


After i left my dream school I ended up in a string of dead-end jobs, when i'd try to do design work my friends would get 20-80/hr but i could only get 10-12 because i don't have a degree. I get abused for it. I can't even apply for most internships because either you have to be in college or graduated. I'm 26, to this day i've never made more than 16gs/year.

My friends from college don't even want to help me. because since I didn't graduate they don't believe I deserve the same jobs as them. People my age are art directors or higher and i barely get entry level jobs. Some of these guys where their art directors for well-known magazine actually have horrible, amateur looking portfolios but that's how far their degree carried them.

Admin

Mitch 19.06.2012. 07:07

Im going to apply to MIT/ and other ivy leagues, critique me!? MIT is my dream school that id like to attend and participate in their biomedical or chemical engineering programs. Im currently a junior in high school. Here is my criteria:

Freshman Year: A's in every class finished the year with a 4.1 but only took honors mathamatics (i believe that may hurt me but i also have heard freshman year is slightly "looked over")

Sophomore year: I really stepped my game up that year and had a teacher who truly influenced me and kind of "sparked" me into the person i am now.
Honors Bio - A
Honors Modern History - A
Honors Alg 2 - A
Honors English - A
SPanish 2 - A
Programming Java Honors - A

Finished the year with a 4.5 cumulatively

Junior year:
AP Bio - A
AP Lit - A
AP Computer Science- A
Honors History - A
Honors Trig - A
Spanish 3 - A
Honors Chem - A

finished with 4.6 cumulatively

SAT - 2120(plan on retaking them)

Senior year(what i intend to take):

AP Calc
Ap prob and stat
AP chem
AP physics
AP Economics
AP Composition
Spanish 4
Honors history

Extra curriculars:

1. Play lacrosse year round on my highschool team(varsity sophomore year) and various elite club teams
2.Started playing the piano last year and am very accomplished(has become a passion now)
3. I participate in the science olympiad and went to states
4. I enjoy building robots with my grandfather(Science teacher & passion)
5. Got the green chord(award presented to a student for every 100 hours of community service)
6. I volunteer at soup kitchens and run science camps at my local YMCA during the summer for 2 weeks at a time
7. Help tutor kids in biology(last year) and mathamatics(maybe not extracurricular? who knows)
8. Started my own community service committee in my local town and got kids from school to join and participate
9. Trying to start up my own lacrosse summer club team for the summer with various teammates
10. I love to make up games, not just random ones in car rides but actual GAMES. Usually they dont involve boards and a bit more complicated compared to the everyday game. My new game involves a pair of magnets along with many objects. (not gonna give away all the secrets (: )
11. Co president of the Key club (club based on community service)

If you havent already noticed i like to do a lot with community service, not just because it looks good on a application but because of the sense of fulfillment i recieve when i know im helping another person.

Oh yeah! Im also top 4% of my class or more specifically 25/595.


Please tell me if youve got accepted to a college at this caliber what you did in and out of school ect. just so i have an idea and also give any helpful tips.

Mitch

Admin 19.06.2012. 07:07

I can tell you that you have a very strong profile, but I can't make anything even close to a guarantee about your chances at acceptance. Your grades and extracurricular activities are stellar, but so are most of those students who apply to MIT. You can bet that you'll see a lot of AP science and math classes on their resume as well, science olympiad, and robotics (usually through their school), but also a lot of sports, music, and volunteer work. Especially when you're applying to a science-heavy institution such as MIT, you're going to need to really show that your passion exceeds or is different than everyone else's. That's really what it comes down to for top universities in the nation: differentiating yourself with something unique that's not academics or even extracurricular activities. Now it's possible that your uniqueness might extend into a manifestation that exists in your EC's, but I've seen everything that you've presented just here on Yahoo! Answers in the past year, and this is only a minute slice of the college applicant pool. Valedictorians, people with 2400 SAT scores, and students recognized nationally for their community involvement are regularly turned away from top universities because of how competitive admissions is.

I'll be attending a top 5 liberal arts college with a <13% acceptance rate in the fall and for me, my "hook" was that I want to study paleontology. In my case, this bled into my EC's as I've volunteered with a natural history museum and their dinosaur branch, so it really helped to show that I'm not just kid who hit his dinosaur phase late, but someone who's really engaged in the field and still wants to pursue it. Just like you, I took a lot of AP / honors classes, was top 10% in my grade (school doesn't rank, so it might have been higher), did a lot of stuff on the outside from volunteering at dog shelters to being captain of the Speech & Debate team, but it's really the paleontology (and maybe the little blurb about my reptiles in the short answer part on the Common App) that made me stand out from everyone else.

Some suggestions:

1. Definitely retake your SAT. You need to get into the 2200 range at minimum to be around the average, and preferably get higher. There really is not safe level to be at; just aim as high as you can and see where you land.

2. Like me, you probably didn't take a full load of AP's in the humanities (English, history, foreign languages) because they aren't your subject, aren't necessary for your future work, and take away from your time, just make sure that you articulate that somewhere because the three years of honors history stands out on the transcript.

3. Pick your essay topic very carefully. You don't want to show that you're a smart person; your grades already show that. You don't want to show that you're an involved person; your EC's already show that. You want to show that you're a unique and gifted individual who's worth admitting not only on the merits of his / her skills and talents, but his / her character and personality. MIT doesn't need smart students, they need smart people.

Admin

Missy:) 22.12.2011. 17:06

Trying to find my first job...? I'm 19.. I'm in college and have no experience. I live in a poverty stricken area, so finding a job is difficult. But no I'm sick of having no job! Yesterday I went in to 5 places (3 told me to go online) one restaurant told me they'd call me if business picked up after the 1st of the year. And the other, a local coffee shop's manager was busy.. but after talking to the employees some one quit & there's a position. I told them I would come back tomorrow..
My question is: how do I present my self, what should I say? Yesterday I wasn't nervous.. I wasn't even prepared.. I just knew I wanted a job.. And today I'm a bundle of nerves.. HELP!

Missy:)

Admin 22.12.2011. 17:06

Here are the steps:

1. Get dressed up (not as nice as you would go to an interview in, but don't look like a slob)
2. Bring the following things : something to write on, pen, resume, paperclips)
3. Go into store during the least busy time of day (usually between 2-4pm for restaurants)
4. Ask for an application
5. Fill out the application.
6. Paperclip your resume on the back
7. Hand in the application
8. Ask to speak with manager
9. Introduce yourself and explain what you want to do and why you want to work there.
10. repeat until you get a job

Usually a person with no work experience will have to apply at over 15-20 places before they get called back for an interview. So, be tough- it's not easy.

If you post or email me your resume, I will gladly critique it for you

Admin

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