New Hope for Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Sufferers

Comments (20)


New Hope for Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Sufferers

By: Deb Bromley

There are many theories with regard to the causes of chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia, many of which may be indeed touching on the truth or at least touching on an aggravator or contributor to these afflictions. Diseases in general have been growing in epidemic proportion over at least the past 20 years, especially in the United States, where our increasingly toxic environment and lifestyles have drifted further and further away from what is natural in the name of progress, technology, and profit. Chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia are no exception, the two often being experienced together, and possibly symptoms of the same disease. Many agree that having one or both of these conditions reflects a compromised immune system, but whether this has resulted from viruses or chemicals or heredity or DNA mutations or other causes is much debated. As in the question of the chicken or the egg, I think the answer lies in what came first, at least in terms of triggering the disease.

We all have unique genetic weaknesses and tendencies, but usually a disease that we may be predisposed to will not surface unless an external environmental factor triggers it. Viruses lay dormant in all of us, as do many bacteria. The body's immune system keeps them in check unless the body is damaged and becomes weak and imbalanced to the point that viruses and bacteria grow out of control and flourish, causing disease. But what external "triggering" factors came first to weaken the immune system to allow such a systemic breakdown to occur?

The answer most likely lies in how increasingly toxic and contaminated our bodies are becoming. This cumulative toxic overload is the result of the growing number of harmful chemicals we're exposed to in our everyday life -- over 10,000 in food processing and preservation alone. We eat chemically-processed foods that contain preservatives, pesticides, dyes, hormones, bleaching agents, neurotoxic artificial sweeteners, steroids, and antibiotics, drink hundreds of chemicals in our tap water, breathe in fumes from factories, are bombarded with radiation from numerous and growing sources, and chemicals are outgassed in our homes from our Teflon-coated pans to our stain-resistant carpets. We are surrounded with plastics, paints, solvents, cleaners, medications, and many other toxic chemicals, and when you mix them all together in our bodies with our own natural chemistry, as in a chemistry lab, the results can be unpredictable and potentially explosive. In addition, antibiotics that destroy good bacteria along with the bad have been dangerously overprescribed, contributing to weakened immune systems, and expensive unnatural synthetic drugs are being dispensed in record numbers that do not cure but only suppress symptoms, while causing a plethora of harmful side effects to the tune of billions of dollars for the pharmaceutical industry.

Recent studies have shown that antibiotics and chemicals can permeate cell walls and destroy, damage, or mutate mitochondria, which most claim cannot be regenerated. What are mitochondria? In short, they are the powerhouses of our bodies. They assimilate food and produce critical nutrients, but their primary function is to manufacture adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a vital component of life. ATP is believed to provide 90-95% of all cellular energy and has been found to act as a neurotransmitter extracellularly. Also, an enormous amount of ATP is required by our energy-hungry muscles. Unfortunately, the brain does not store ATP, ATP cannot be shared between organ systems, its supply is very limited, and the demand for it by the body is very high. Therefore, ATP must be constantly synthesized to provide a continuous supply of energy or an ATP-imbalance occurs, which may lead to neuronal cell deaths, chronic fatigue from lack of energy, nutritional deficiencies, and muscle weakness and pain as in fibromyalgia, among many other symptoms. ATP imbalance or poor regulation can be very dangerous - too much ATP in a few areas of the body can actually be just as damaging as too little, such as in spinal cord injuries.

Scientists have theorized that mutations in mitochondrial DNA also contribute to aging, and when the production of ATP is interrupted or stopped for any number of reasons, a cascade of free-radical damage begins. The key to chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia, and many other diseases, may lie in cellular damage by chemicals, while the road to recovery may lie in eliminating toxins that cause cellular damage and pursuing natural courses of treatment that help the body heal itself.

Although most doctors and researchers do not believe mitochondria can be repaired or regenerated, they used to say the same thing about brain cells, and that has since been disproved. The body is a miraculous creation, and if it is not abused, it has many self-healing and regenerative abilities. I came across one University of California-Berkeley research project recently where mitochondria in rats were able to be rejuvenated with large doses of acetyl-L-carnitine and alpha-lipoic acid, common natural dietary supplements, which also appeared to make the old rats more youthful. Guaifenesin has also been used successfully by fibromyalgia sufferers to help relieve pain. It is believed that guaifenesin works both by causing urinary excretion of excess uric acid, phosphate, and other substances that should have been excreted by the kidneys that have built up in the cells and tissue to the point that they depress ATP formation, and by actually reinforcing cell walls to minimize entry by toxins and further damage to the cells. (There seem to be very few all-natural products that contain guaifenesin without ephedrine or chemicals. I found one product made by Naturade called Herbal Expec that I would recommend)

After "Yuppie Flu" first surfaced in the 1980's, a few progressive doctors tried giving patients injections of adenosine monophosphate (AMP), a chemical precursor of ATP, but this was expensive, inconvenient, difficult to tolerate, and the results were very slow and gradual. Next, in the 1990's, oral ATP supplements were tried, and are still available today, but they had side effects and did not allow the body to naturally assimilate the ATP itself which makes it less targeted and effective. But more recently, there has been significant success with another precursor to ATP - D-Ribose. D-Ribose is a complex sugar with no side effects. It goes to work quickly in the body, effectively fueling the mitochondria so that additional needed ATP can be produced for many hours at a time. In particular, it increases ATP production in muscles, including the heart, therefore besides improving muscle strength and helping alleviate pain, it additionally benefits individuals with heart problems, and increases blood circulation, oxygen levels, and energy levels. Ribose formulas often include creatine, as the two are believed to work synergistically together to increase overall ATP production.

With cellular damage, and the often accompanying gut damage from ingesting chemicals, there are also often multiple nutritional deficiencies that result from poor absorption and assimilation, regardless if you think you have been eating well, therefore a potent vitamin and mineral supplement and an immune system builder is also recommended, preferably liquid sublinguals (under the tongue) to enhance absorption. Since our soil has been damaged from chemicals, and thus much of our food is lacking in vitamins and minerals, the vitamin/mineral nutritional supplement should be the one thing you take for life to maintain health even if you feel fine. For those who can afford it, a new spectroscopic test is available from Spectracell that examines white blood cells, which help protect the body and combat disease, and can pinpoint your specific and unique cellular deficiencies.

Although the natural supplements mentioned above may be extremely helpful in repairing cell damage over time, increasing energy, and may potentially help alleviate symptoms in the short-term, in order to foster long-term healing and maintenance of health, it is critical that toxins that store in fatty tissue be removed from the body, such as with binding whole grains, natural detoxifiers, and chelation, and further toxic exposure that contributes to cellular damage and other health problems be avoided. Since your body is likely chemically addicted to many substances, a natural course of treatment that involves the elimination of chemicals often results in short-term withdrawal symptoms or temporary exacerbation of symptoms where you feel worse before you feel better, but this stage passes quickly.

The more you understand what you're fighting and your options, the better armed you will be to battle it. And half the battle is knowing and eliminating what caused the disease in the first place. Although there are supplements that may help, natural steps to better health do not have to cost a fortune. There are many inexpensive dietary measures that can be taken. To learn more about the thousands of harmful toxins in our food and everyday environment and how to avoid them, how to bind toxins and remove them from the body, how to treat symptoms of disease naturally, and how to adopt a non-toxic chemical-free diet and natural lifestyle that will help your body heal itself, please visit the NatureGem website at http://www.naturegem.com. From the home page, you can also link to a copy of this article with active links to helpful resources.

About The Author

Deb Bromley is a former science and technology researcher and the President of NatureGem Nontoxic Living (http://www.naturegem.com), an organization devoted to promoting awareness of toxins in our food and environment that can cause disease, and providing access to nutrition information, natural remedies, and alternative health resources. She was formerly a researcher at the NASA Lewis Research Center, a professional staff member of Cleveland State University, and a Corning research contractor. Additionally, she was the operations manager for the Battelle Memorial Institute Midwest Technology Transfer Center, and an editor for a major Cleveland-area regional newspaper. Ms. Bromley studied environmental health and behavioral science at the New York Institute of Technology and is the founder of The Legacy Health Foundation, a non-profit hunger initiative created to provide chemical-free healing foods to underserved populations.

Comments

PAT T 09.07.2008. 19:07

could fibromyalgia be the cause of my platelets being elevated? my platelets are high and i have had fibromyalgia for 10 yrs. i saw that raised platelets could be caused from chronic inflammation. so i was curious.

PAT T

Admin 09.07.2008. 19:07

Conditions or factors that can cause a high platelet count are:

Iron-deficiency anemia
Hemolytic anemia
Absence of a spleen (after surgery to remove this organ)
Cancer
Inflammatory or infectious diseases such as connective tissue disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, and tuberculosis
Reactions to medicines

Some conditions can lead to a high platelet count that lasts for only a short time. These include:

Recovery from serious loss of blood
Recovery from a very low platelet count caused by excessive alcohol use and lack of vitamin B12 or folate
Acute infection or inflammation
Response to physical activity
________________________________

So yes, it would make sense that Fibromyalgia may play a factor but, I would still encourage you to have further testing done to rule out any other conditions.

When you had your blood work done did you have your B12 & Ferritin levels checked? If not, you should. Many people with Fibro & Chronic Fatigue Syndrome suffer from chronically low B12. If you find that those levels are low, B12 shots or supplements are very helpful & may have an influence on your platelet count.

You might also check into physicians in your area that specialize in Fibromyalgia/ CFS treatment. Feel free to email me if you have any questions. In the meantime, I would suggest taking a quality pharmaceutical-grade fish oil supplement to aid in relieving inflammation. I personally take Dr. Sears Fish Oil & Magnesium supplements daily & they both have helped me immensely. Hope this info helps. Good luck!




****To respond the answer above me, I know that some say inflammation isn't a component of Fibro but, I disagree. Many researchers feel that chronic inflammation along with an altered immune system may either be the cause or contribute to fibromyalgia (FM) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) symptoms.

Chemical messengers called cytokines form an integral part element of the immune system. As messengers, cytokines tell other immune cells to activate, grow or even die. Dr. Lionel Ivashkiv, a rheumatologist, explains that ?cytokines regulate the immune system responses and can drive the inflammatory process.?

For the latest information & studies being done, I suggest checking out Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum & his work in this area. Additionally, this link details a study done on the success of a certain drug in effectively reducing inflammation in Fibro sufferers:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306987704005663
Current studies & trials being done re: Fibromyalgia:
http://www.fmaware.org/site/PageServer?pagename=research_clinicalTrials
Here's another good link for current studies & info:
http://www.pandoranet.info/research.html
I know that people have differing opinions on this but, I think there is still much debate on this topic. A lot more research needs to be done in this field, before we have all the answers.

Admin

Myrt 11.02.2006. 16:13

Has anyone ever filed for disability with fibromyalgia and won? I have fibromyalgia and recently applied for disability.

Myrt

Admin 11.02.2006. 16:13

Yes. I am on SSDI for Fibromyalgia. I had the problem that I filed when I was 27 years old so the Board that reviews the applicants denied me twice. Finally, my application was going before the Appeals Judge and before the court date he read my file. He overturned the original rejections and I received payment back to the date of disability. It took over two years for this process.

My best suggestion is that when you answer any questions answer as if it's your worst day possible. There's an article called Helping Fibromyalgia Patients Obtain Social Security Benefits by Joshua W. Potter, Esq.
From: The Journal of Musculoskeletal Medicine September 1992
http://www2.rpa.net/~lrandall/ssdi_fms.html

Another good article is http://www.disabilitysecrets.com/social_security_disability_fibromyalgia.html

Another helpful article is:
Why Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) & Fibromyalgia (FM) Sufferers Lose Their SSDI Claims
by Janet Mizrahi
ImmuneSupport.com

09-01-2000

You feel awful all the time. You can barely dredge up the energy to take a bath, no less get dressed, go to work, and actually be productive. You know you?re disabled--your doctor knows you?re disabled. So you?ll win that disability case to get SSDI, right? Well, not necessarily so, says Scott Davis, an attorney who specializes in FM/CFS disability cases.
According to Davis, ?One of the biggest reasons people lose disability cases is because they don?t retain an attorney at the beginning of the process. It sounds self-serving, but it?s not,? he adds. ?Disability attorneys work on contingency fee basis, meaning you only pay a fee if you win your case ? you have nothing to lose.?

Using a lawyer before or at the time of filing a claim will help build the proper case to show to Social Security and a judge, who will ultimately hear the case and decide your fate.

But besides that, Davis says, an attorney can help you forge ahead with the process. Many people never bother to file a claim because they don?t have the energy or feel it?s just hopeless or simply because they don?t know what to do. An attorney not only can give you hope that you have a case, he or she guides you through the process.

Another death knell to a disability case, Davis says, is inadequate medical records. ?Disability cases are ultimately won and lost on adequately documented medical records and detailed opinions from the treating physician regarding their ability to work, or their inability to work,? he states.

Lack of documentation can happen in a number of ways. One may be a result of a lack of adequate treatment. ?Particularly in the FM/CFS arena,? Davis says, ?people are repeatedly told by their doctors that there?s nothing medicine can do, to live with their illness and deal with it. Which is exactly what people do. They stop seeking treatment.

?Or I?ve seen people do the opposite. They go to a host of doctors on an odyssey to get a diagnosis. After being worn out from seeing doctor after doctor and getting treatments without any benefit, they quit going. The attitude becomes, why bother? Nothing is helping to alleviate the symptoms.?

Both tactics result in barren medical records -- a huge mistake. ?Even if you have a very good attorney, I?m only the orchestrator,? Davis says. ?My ability to help a client is more limited if there are no medical records or if the medical records don?t say anything. Medical records load the gun for me to use when I argue a client is unable to work.?

Davis suggests that ideally, people should view their medical records on a regular basis. This way you can see for yourself if your complaints of pain or other symptoms are being documented. If they are not, patients can tactfully ask their doctors to work with them to get the records in shape for their cases. Many general practitioners and HMO physicians are overburdened and do not take the time to dictate their reports and their handwriting is illegible. Davis explains that the reality of this is that SSI people evaluating the case and judges won?t take the time to read something that?s difficult to sift through. Sometimes making the physician aware that your entire claim is dependent on the medical records can help.

Davis cautions people with claims that sometimes, even if everything is in order, you still won?t win. ?I recently lost a case where two treating physicians, a physical therapist and her husband who she worked with, all concluded that a woman with FM wasn?t able to work. The judge wouldn?t listen to either of them and her claim was denied. Her case was adequately documented, but the judge was looking for a reason to deny her.

?Unfortunately,? Davis says, ?once social security and the judge look to deny the claim, they?ll say the doctor?s opinion is not supported by objective medical evidence or by medical records, even though it is. This happens even in good cases! If you get in front of the wrong judge, he or she will use that as the way to support a denial of your claim.?

Davis will appeal the recent case, but he advises people to make absolutely certain, from the outset, that they get treatment, that the treatment is properly documented, that the claims they make verbally to SSDI are consistent with those in their written records, and to retain an attorney. ?It?s not the only way to win,? he says, ?but it can?t hurt.?

Scott E. Davis is a social security and long-term disability insurance attorney who represents clients throughout the United States. Although he represents a wide spectrum of cases, a majority of his practice is devoted to representing individuals with FM and/or CFIDS. In most cases a fee is charged only if the client obtains benefits. Mr. Davis invites your questions and inquiries regarding representation via email info@scottdavispc.com or telephone (602)482-4300.

Admin

Lorenzo T 12.11.2008. 04:41

What is Fibromyalgia, and what causes it? Is there a cure? What is it?

Lorenzo T

Admin 12.11.2008. 04:41

Fibromyalgia syndrome is a fairly common, chronic illness which causes the sufferer to have extreme muscle pain and fatigue. Usually sufferers feel pain in their shoulders, neck, hips and their back whenever slight pressure is applied. The condition has been compared to arthritis due to the pain involved but it is not truly an arthritic problem as it does not cause inflammation or damage to the joints in any way.

People who do live with Fibromyalgia syndrome tend to find that they often cannot carry on with their daily lives as normal. It does restrict them in various ways and it is mainly considered to be a rheumatic problem. Other symptoms which sufferers may experience include morning stiffness, a sensitive temperature, irritable bowel syndrome and headaches to name but a few. So, if you do suffer from this syndrome it is definitely a very painful one and the cause of the condition is currently unknown.
According to my information regarding fibromyalgia one should avoid the nightshade vegetable and fruits:
1. eggplant
2. tomatoes
3. potatoes (except for yams)
4. peppers of all types (bell peppers, orange, red and jalapeno

I am studying this due to my doctors thought I had Lupus which is in the same family, so therefore I have to avoid the above list as well.

Hope this is helpful. You might want to purchase the book called:
The Fibromyalgia Solution by: David Dryland, MD with Lorie List. It's a wonderful book to read.

Admin

Sandy L 17.02.2006. 08:45

Can I receive Social Serurity Disability benefits for having Fibromyalgia? Array

Sandy L

Admin 17.02.2006. 08:45

Yes. I am on SSDI for Fibromyalgia. I had the problem that I filed when I was 27 years old so the Board that reviews the applicants denied me twice. Finally, my application was going before the Appeals Judge and before the court date he read my file. He overturned the original rejections and I received payment back to the date of disability. It took over two years for this process.

My best suggestion is that when you answer any questions answer as if it's your worst day possible. There's an article called Helping Fibromyalgia Patients Obtain Social Security Benefits by Joshua W. Potter, Esq.
From: The Journal of Musculoskeletal Medicine September 1992
http://www2.rpa.net/~lrandall/ssdi_fms.html

Another good article is http://www.disabilitysecrets.com/social_security_disability_fibromyalgia.html

Another helpful article is:
Why Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) & Fibromyalgia (FM) Sufferers Lose Their SSDI Claims
by Janet Mizrahi
ImmuneSupport.com

09-01-2000

You feel awful all the time. You can barely dredge up the energy to take a bath, no less get dressed, go to work, and actually be productive. You know you?re disabled--your doctor knows you?re disabled. So you?ll win that disability case to get SSDI, right? Well, not necessarily so, says Scott Davis, an attorney who specializes in FM/CFS disability cases.
According to Davis, ?One of the biggest reasons people lose disability cases is because they don?t retain an attorney at the beginning of the process. It sounds self-serving, but it?s not,? he adds. ?Disability attorneys work on contingency fee basis, meaning you only pay a fee if you win your case ? you have nothing to lose.?

Using a lawyer before or at the time of filing a claim will help build the proper case to show to Social Security and a judge, who will ultimately hear the case and decide your fate.

But besides that, Davis says, an attorney can help you forge ahead with the process. Many people never bother to file a claim because they don?t have the energy or feel it?s just hopeless or simply because they don?t know what to do. An attorney not only can give you hope that you have a case, he or she guides you through the process.

Another death knell to a disability case, Davis says, is inadequate medical records. ?Disability cases are ultimately won and lost on adequately documented medical records and detailed opinions from the treating physician regarding their ability to work, or their inability to work,? he states.

Lack of documentation can happen in a number of ways. One may be a result of a lack of adequate treatment. ?Particularly in the FM/CFS arena,? Davis says, ?people are repeatedly told by their doctors that there?s nothing medicine can do, to live with their illness and deal with it. Which is exactly what people do. They stop seeking treatment.

?Or I?ve seen people do the opposite. They go to a host of doctors on an odyssey to get a diagnosis. After being worn out from seeing doctor after doctor and getting treatments without any benefit, they quit going. The attitude becomes, why bother? Nothing is helping to alleviate the symptoms.?

Both tactics result in barren medical records -- a huge mistake. ?Even if you have a very good attorney, I?m only the orchestrator,? Davis says. ?My ability to help a client is more limited if there are no medical records or if the medical records don?t say anything. Medical records load the gun for me to use when I argue a client is unable to work.?

Davis suggests that ideally, people should view their medical records on a regular basis. This way you can see for yourself if your complaints of pain or other symptoms are being documented. If they are not, patients can tactfully ask their doctors to work with them to get the records in shape for their cases. Many general practitioners and HMO physicians are overburdened and do not take the time to dictate their reports and their handwriting is illegible. Davis explains that the reality of this is that SSI people evaluating the case and judges won?t take the time to read something that?s difficult to sift through. Sometimes making the physician aware that your entire claim is dependent on the medical records can help.

Davis cautions people with claims that sometimes, even if everything is in order, you still won?t win. ?I recently lost a case where two treating physicians, a physical therapist and her husband who she worked with, all concluded that a woman with FM wasn?t able to work. The judge wouldn?t listen to either of them and her claim was denied. Her case was adequately documented, but the judge was looking for a reason to deny her.

?Unfortunately,? Davis says, ?once social security and the judge look to deny the claim, they?ll say the doctor?s opinion is not supported by objective medical evidence or by medical records, even though it is. This happens even in good cases! If you get in front of the wrong judge, he or she will use that as the way to support a denial of your claim.?

Davis will appeal the recent case, but he advises people to make absolutely certain, from the outset, that they get treatment, that the treatment is properly documented, that the claims they make verbally to SSDI are consistent with those in their written records, and to retain an attorney. ?It?s not the only way to win,? he says, ?but it can?t hurt.?

Scott E. Davis is a social security and long-term disability insurance attorney who represents clients throughout the United States. Although he represents a wide spectrum of cases, a majority of his practice is devoted to representing individuals with FM and/or CFIDS. In most cases a fee is charged only if the client obtains benefits. Mr. Davis invites your questions and inquiries regarding representation via email info@scottdavispc.com or telephone (602)482-4300.
Good Luck!

Admin

steel 05.11.2008. 19:04

Does any one have Chronic Fatigue syndrome. If so what are you symptoms and how do you overcome the? i am a sufferer

steel

Admin 05.11.2008. 19:04

I wass diagnosed in 2002 with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome which resulted in the diagnosis some 6 months later of Fibromyalgia. I felt drained, listless, nothing was worth living for and the whole point of my life seemed to have been taken awayd. Fortunatley for me I had an excellent GP who understood the diagnosis and how to manage it. The first thing he did was to put me on some mild anti-depressants which although I was uneasy taken in the first place, did help me to establish a sleep pattern at night. Rest is one of the main things that you need, but it is often difficult to adopt a good sleeping pattern. He suggested that at night, It would be a good idea to remove the tv and other things that may unconscikously keep me awake rather than entice me to sleep. I also started taking a warm shower about an hour before bed to relax me . and I never drank tea or coffee again before going to bed. It took a little while, but eventually, I got into the habit and bed time became a time of sanctuary not stress. Rest rest rest is all I can suggest, and I hope that you get through this very tiring and trying illness

Admin

Pat M 07.05.2006. 04:32

Could Fibromyalgia be a composite of allergies.? I've read about an affect of anti-depressants on histamine. Can anyone explain ?
Also, the correlation between allergies and Fibromyalgia. Anyone with a theory? Thanks

Pat M

Admin 07.05.2006. 04:32

Fibromyalgia is complicated, I have it. My theory is a little different than alot of others. I believe it's a breakdown of the immune system due to lymphatic problems. See the lymph system is responsible for the T and B cells that fight illness.

This came out recently, excellent article, somewhat backs what I've believed all along, the fibro, CFS and other illnesses come from a whacked out lymph system.

UK Physician Believes He's Found Proof of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome ImmuneSupport.com

08-10-2005

Doctor takes stigma out of 'yuppie flu'
By Deborah Haile

Dr. Raymond Perrin believes he has proof that chronic fatigue syndrome - once dubbed yuppie flu - has a physical cause.

For years sufferers of CFS - which includes ME - have lived under the stigma of being diagnosed with a condition that many dismissed as being in the mind. But Manchester osteopath Dr. Perrin believes he has proved that the debilitating syndrome is the physical result of the way the body deals with toxins.

He believes a picture of varicose lymphatic vessels taken during a research project at Salford University shows for the first time the "backflow" of lymphatic drainage that he believes is the cause of toxin build-up.

And it is this accumulation of toxins in the central nervous system, which Dr. Perrin believes is the cause of conditions such as chronic fatigue syndrome and ME.

Valves

Dr. Perrin, who runs clinics in Prestwich, central Manchester and London, said: "Normally these vessels are the size of the thinnest pencil line and you can't usually see them without a magnifying glass, but the fact they are swollen like this is significant. There is a backflow against the valves.

"Very rarely can you see these, but with every person I have seen in the last 16 years with chronic fatigue syndrome you can feel them under the surface. It means this person has had ME for a number of years."

Until now experts have believed that valves in the lymphatic vessels only allowed the flow of fluids in one direction. But Dr. Perrin says these varicose lymphatic vessels - which resemble varicose veins but are the same colour of the skin instead of a bluish colour - are the proof that the backflow exists, when vessels are damaged, allowing toxins to concentrate in the central nervous system. He revealed the picture at a seminar at Salford University. He hopes to publish it in a respected medical journal later in the year.

Margaret Cannon, who had to give up work because of the condition, said: "After about three months of Raymond's treatment my concentration was restored and the symptoms improved greatly."


Online at http://www.manchesteronline.co.uk/men/news/health/s/168/168143_doctor_takes_stigma_out_of_yuppie_flu.html

PS: allergies, long term ones can mess up the lymphatics by the congestion in the nodes, so it all ties in.

Admin

crittervillegal 26.02.2006. 20:08

Has anyone been able to retire on disability for Fibromyalgia or get Disability from the State? Array

crittervillegal

Admin 26.02.2006. 20:08

Yes. I am on SSDI for Fibromyalgia. I had the problem that I filed when I was 27 years old so the Board that reviews the applicants denied me twice. Finally, my application was going before the Appeals Judge and before the court date he read my file. He overturned the original rejections and I received payment back to the date of disability. It took over two years for this process.

My best suggestion is that when you answer any questions answer as if it's your worst day possible. There's an article called Helping Fibromyalgia Patients Obtain Social Security Benefits by Joshua W. Potter, Esq.
From: The Journal of Musculoskeletal Medicine September 1992
http://www2.rpa.net/~lrandall/ssdi_fms.html

Another good article is http://www.disabilitysecrets.com/social_security_disability_fibromyalgia.html

Another helpful article is:
Why Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) & Fibromyalgia (FM) Sufferers Lose Their SSDI Claims
by Janet Mizrahi
ImmuneSupport.com

09-01-2000

You feel awful all the time. You can barely dredge up the energy to take a bath, no less get dressed, go to work, and actually be productive. You know you?re disabled--your doctor knows you?re disabled. So you?ll win that disability case to get SSDI, right? Well, not necessarily so, says Scott Davis, an attorney who specializes in FM/CFS disability cases.
According to Davis, ?One of the biggest reasons people lose disability cases is because they don?t retain an attorney at the beginning of the process. It sounds self-serving, but it?s not,? he adds. ?Disability attorneys work on contingency fee basis, meaning you only pay a fee if you win your case ? you have nothing to lose.?

Using a lawyer before or at the time of filing a claim will help build the proper case to show to Social Security and a judge, who will ultimately hear the case and decide your fate.

But besides that, Davis says, an attorney can help you forge ahead with the process. Many people never bother to file a claim because they don?t have the energy or feel it?s just hopeless or simply because they don?t know what to do. An attorney not only can give you hope that you have a case, he or she guides you through the process.

Another death knell to a disability case, Davis says, is inadequate medical records. ?Disability cases are ultimately won and lost on adequately documented medical records and detailed opinions from the treating physician regarding their ability to work, or their inability to work,? he states.

Lack of documentation can happen in a number of ways. One may be a result of a lack of adequate treatment. ?Particularly in the FM/CFS arena,? Davis says, ?people are repeatedly told by their doctors that there?s nothing medicine can do, to live with their illness and deal with it. Which is exactly what people do. They stop seeking treatment.

?Or I?ve seen people do the opposite. They go to a host of doctors on an odyssey to get a diagnosis. After being worn out from seeing doctor after doctor and getting treatments without any benefit, they quit going. The attitude becomes, why bother? Nothing is helping to alleviate the symptoms.?

Both tactics result in barren medical records -- a huge mistake. ?Even if you have a very good attorney, I?m only the orchestrator,? Davis says. ?My ability to help a client is more limited if there are no medical records or if the medical records don?t say anything. Medical records load the gun for me to use when I argue a client is unable to work.?

Davis suggests that ideally, people should view their medical records on a regular basis. This way you can see for yourself if your complaints of pain or other symptoms are being documented. If they are not, patients can tactfully ask their doctors to work with them to get the records in shape for their cases. Many general practitioners and HMO physicians are overburdened and do not take the time to dictate their reports and their handwriting is illegible. Davis explains that the reality of this is that SSI people evaluating the case and judges won?t take the time to read something that?s difficult to sift through. Sometimes making the physician aware that your entire claim is dependent on the medical records can help.

Davis cautions people with claims that sometimes, even if everything is in order, you still won?t win. ?I recently lost a case where two treating physicians, a physical therapist and her husband who she worked with, all concluded that a woman with FM wasn?t able to work. The judge wouldn?t listen to either of them and her claim was denied. Her case was adequately documented, but the judge was looking for a reason to deny her.

?Unfortunately,? Davis says, ?once social security and the judge look to deny the claim, they?ll say the doctor?s opinion is not supported by objective medical evidence or by medical records, even though it is. This happens even in good cases! If you get in front of the wrong judge, he or she will use that as the way to support a denial of your claim.?

Davis will appeal the recent case, but he advises people to make absolutely certain, from the outset, that they get treatment, that the treatment is properly documented, that the claims they make verbally to SSDI are consistent with those in their written records, and to retain an attorney. ?It?s not the only way to win,? he says, ?but it can?t hurt.?

Scott E. Davis is a social security and long-term disability insurance attorney who represents clients throughout the United States. Although he represents a wide spectrum of cases, a majority of his practice is devoted to representing individuals with FM and/or CFIDS. In most cases a fee is charged only if the client obtains benefits. Mr. Davis invites your questions and inquiries regarding representation via email info@scottdavispc.com or telephone (602)482-4300.

Admin

libby_2235 19.02.2007. 06:35

Chronic Fatigue? For about 7 years now, I have had a lot of trouble getting sleep. I go through phases where I either don't sleep at all, I take 2-3 hours to fall asleep, and sometimes I fall asleep pretty quick. However, no matter how much sleep I get, I am ALWAYS exhausted, all day, every day. This is the biggest problem. I sometimes fall asleep at work when I am on hold, and I have nearly fallen asleep so many times driving home.

I've had many doctors say "it's chronic fatigue." I don't need a label, I need something to help. They always tell me to eat healthy, work out, etc. but I do these things and I have done this nearly all of my life. I had a sleep study done, but they were mostly testing for sleep apnea, which I knew I did not have. The only useful information that came out of the study is that I grind my teeth at night.

I have an appointment with a sleep specialist in a few weeks, but does anyone have any ideas or suggestions? I've tried herbal things, but they never work.

libby_2235

Admin 19.02.2007. 06:35

I can relate. Despite the fact that you are "chronically fatigued" You may not actually have chronic fatigue as such. In the case of chronic fatigue which can result from a number of diseases such as glandular fever and ross river virus etc, You could get 10 solid hours of sleep every night, but still struggle for the energy required to tie your shoe laces. This type of chronic fatigue unfortunately just has to be waited out. Recovering from CFS resulting from Glandular fever, the sufferer should just try to take it easy. Vitamin B supplements can also help. While it can last for a couple of years, I would be very surprised for it to last 7 years

Fibromyalgia means (from greek) muscle pain. It's causes are many and varied, and most often result from strength imbalances. Yoga or pilates would help with that. While the pain can make it difficult to sleep, fibromyalgia is a symptom of a problem, not a problem in and of itself.

It sounds though, like you are exhausted from insufficient sleep. This too is a very debilitating condition. But the good news is it is possible to break the cycle. I do not know what you have already tried, so here goes.

1. Get a new bed. Obvious, but a top quality bed, with new pillows could be all it takes. if you don't already, sleep alone, at least for a while.

2. It sounds like you have a stressful job, and find it hard to unwind - hence the grinding of teeth in your sleep, a sign of stress and tension. Try taking up yoga. By setting aside the time to do yoga, you will both relax, and exercise. Vigorous exercise too close to bed time can prevent sleep, so yoga being strenuous yet slow could help. The movements of yoga also loosen up your body and get rid of the aches and pains that can interupt your sleep.

3. Routine. go to bed early, no matter what. Chill out to some white noise, and get up at the same time every day. don't lie in bed once you wake.

4. Try altering your diet. Eat fresh healthy food. It sounds a bit fringe, but experiment with a wheat free diet. Allergies to gluten, and lactose can develop later in life (I don't mean old age, just older than being a kid) and sufferers can experience the symptoms you describe. Nothing to lose by trying eh?

I know that this isn't the panacea you are looking for but I hope some of it helps. What you're feeling can drive you crazy I know, but you will get back to your bouncy younger self.

good luck

Admin

Jonathan V 09.09.2012. 13:01

Do I have Lyme disease? taking medication but I'm really confused, help? Okay, so the last couple of years I supposedly had Fibromyalgia/Chronic fatigue syndrome, and I went to this specialist for it. But after a while he asked me if I was ever biten by a tick. I did blood tests and it came out that I have a bartonella infection...My question is, does this officially mean I'm a Lyme disease patient, since bartonella can be transmitted to the body by a tick? At first I thought it was called "tick-borne encephalitis" but now I think it's just chronic lyme disease.

I'm getting two different antibiotics now, called:

- Rifadine 300 mg
- Azithromycine Teva 500 mg

Maybe this could help..?

So am I actually a Lyme disease sufferer? I just want this cleared up because I only have a next appointment with my doctor in October, until then I can't reach him to ask what exactly is wrong with me. Thanks!!

Jonathan V

Admin 09.09.2012. 13:01

Jonathan V,
Bartonella are bacteria that live inside cells; they can infect humans, mammals, and a wide range of wild animals. Not all Bartonella species cause disease in humans. It is mainly carried by cats and causes cat-scratch disease, endocarditis, and several other serious diseases in humans. Bartonella bacteria are known to be carried by fleas, body lice and ticks. Scientists suspect that ticks are a source of infection in some human cases of bartonellosis. People with tick bites and no known exposure to cats have acquired the disease. People who recall being bitten by ticks have been co-infected with Lyme and Bartonella. More research needs to be done to establish the role of ticks in spreading the disease. Lyme disease is a bacterial illness caused by a bacterium called a "spirochete." In the United States, the actual name of the bacterium is Borrelia burgdorferi. In Europe, another bacterium, Borrelia afzelii, also causes Lyme disease. Oral antibiotics are the standard treatment for early-stage Lyme disease. These usually includes the ?drug of choice? doxycycline for adults and children older than 8, or amoxicillin or cefuroxime for adults, younger children, and pregnant or breast-feeding women. These drugs often clear the infection and prevent complications. A 14- to 21-day course of antibiotics is usually recommended, but some studies suggest that courses lasting 10 to 14 days are equally effective. It follows that your doctor does not appear to consider Lyme disease, but recognises that a bacterial infection is likely the cause of your symptoms. Rifampin is an antibiotic and prevents bacteria from spreading in your body. It is used to treat or prevent tuberculosis (TB). Rifampin may also be used to eliminate a bacteria from your nose and throat that may cause meningitis or other infections, even if you do not have an infection. It also prevents you from spreading this bacteria to other people, but the medication will not treat an infection caused by the bacteria. Azithromycin belongs to a group of drugs called macrolide antibiotics and fights bacteria in the body. Azithromycin is used to treat many different types of infections caused by bacteria, such as respiratory infections, skin infections, ear infections, and sexually transmitted diseases. He is thereby trying to stop the infection spreading with rifampin and trying to treat the bacteria with azithromycin. You would be advised to stop your anxiety attack about Lyme disease, and do some research instead of jumping to conclusions ? which is always a risky business, which reminds me of the drunken man who, jumping to the conclusion that his glass of beer was by his lips, tilted his beer glass and poured the contents down his shirt. Is your shirt wet?!!


ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED.

It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms.


The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.


Hope this helps
matador 89

Admin

Mrs M 05.05.2011. 00:55

Hoe to deal with people who don't understand Chronic Fatigue Syndrome? I have had chronic fatigue syndrome for about 6 months now. My husband and I are taking a trip back to our home town for a visit. I'm seeking any advice from other sufferers on how to deal with people who don't understand or who refuse to accept the condition?
Unfortunately, we have some family and friends who I KNOW are not going to understand my condition. We have already told the majority of our family and our close friends, but a couple of them are very narrow-minded and are insisting that 'it's all in my head' even though I have a doctor's medical diagnosis and tests proving that the Epstein-Barr virus is still in my system.
I don't like having to explain to people why I go off and sleep during the day, it's none of their damn business, but unfortunately a lot of our family lacks basic etiquette like that :(

Mrs M

Admin 05.05.2011. 00:55

Don't tell people who don't need to know. Most of my family know that I'm unwell, but they don't know I specifically have been diagnosed with CFS. And I don't think they need to know. It's none of their business, nor is it going to help my case. My Mum and Grandmother know the extent of it, but I haven't told my uncles, aunts, cousins etc. I only tell the people who need to know. If I'm not well then my Mum or Grandma can explain to the rest of the family.

Another option is that you tell them you have Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (if you can pronounce it!). That's the technical term for CFS. If you tell them you have that, chances are they wont ask anymore, or if they do ask they probably wont have have any prior knowledge of what it is. You can then choose how you want to explain it to them and they probably wont have any preconceived knowledge on it.

Don't expect your friends and family to get it. No one who doesn't have it wont get it. You just have to accept that. It's good that you've got your husband, hopefully he can vouch for you.

I hope that's somewhat helpful.


EDIT- Don't listen to 'listento....'. She does not know about this condition or Fibromyalgia. She doesn't have the right to dismiss other's pain and fatigue. Maybe you could find another hobby other than belittling people?

....

Admin

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