Redeeming Unsaturated Fat

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Redeeming Unsaturated Fat

By: Protica Nutritional Research

The most dreaded word in many dieter's vocabulary is 'fat'. It is not uncommon to hear a dieter discuss their avoidance of eating fat as if it were something thoroughly unwholesome, or even life-threatening, like an allergen, or a contagious disease.

In one way, this impassioned hatred of fat is positive. It reflects a generally understood medical truth that overindulging in fat-rich foods often causes unwanted, and unhealthy, weight gain.

However, in another way, this fat-phobia is potentially dangerous, because awareness of fat is not enough; an understanding of how fat influences weight gain and overall health is required. Unfortunately, those who dread and avoid all fat " as a rule " are overlooking an important difference between saturated fat and unsaturated fat.

Saturated fat is often the real culprit when it comes to unwanted, and potentially unhealthy, weight gain. These types of fats, which are solid at room temperature, initiate the production of LDL cholesterol, or " bad cholesterol " . In addition to weight gain, as cholesterol increases, so does the risk of heart disease. In fact, saturated fats increase LDL cholesterol disproportionately more than dietary cholesterol itself; that is how powerfully bad it is to the human body[i]. Dreading and avoiding this kind of fat is therefore quite intelligent.

Some dieters, however, are motivated less by concerns about high cholesterol and heart disease than they are about cosmetic weight gain. This is not a criticism; the adverse health effects of excess weight are well documented, as are the emotional traumas and social stigmas that tragically affect tens of millions of overweight people, especially children[ii].

Unquestionably, an excess intake of saturated fat is linked to weight gain. This is because a fat gram contains more than twice the amount of calories as a protein gram - 9 calories versus 4 calories[iii]. As a result, dieters can eat more than twice as many protein grams as fat grams to achieve the same amount of caloric intake. For dieters who are steadfastly watching every calorie, this 125% calorie difference between protein and fat can have an enormous impact.

Fat cells, once created, cannot be removed[1]; they can only be made smaller through the body's metabolic calorie-burning process[iv]. Since an individual's rate of metabolism is determined largely by genetics, a dieter with a slower than average metabolism will spend months, perhaps even years longer struggling to shrink fat cells then would his or her metabolically-gifted counterpart[v].

It is quite easy to understand, based on the above discussion, why the very idea of fat is dreaded by dieters; both because of the health hazards it poses, and its capacity to create excess fat cells. And it is just as easy to understand why many people are so afraid of consuming this kind of fat that they strive to remove all fat from their diet. This, however, is a large nutritional oversight.

Fat is a macronutrient that the body requires for a number of important functions. Fat is a source of energy. It helps keep the body warm, it aids in the absorption of some vitamins, and helps regulate the proper functioning of the brain and nervous system[vi]. This appears, however, to be a contradiction.

On the one hand there are health and weight gain hazards associated with fat, and on the other hand, there are proven health benefits associated with fat. How can this be? The answer is easily understood when we differentiate between the two types of fat: saturated and unsaturated. The kind of fat associated with health hazards is the former; the kind that the body needs and uses effectively is the latter.

There are two sub-types of unsaturated fat: polysaturated fat, and monosaturated fat. Popular foods that contain polysaturated fat include safflower oil and corn oil, while monosaturated fats are found in such foods as olive oil and peanut oil. These unsaturated fats are those that provide the body with the most useful and efficient sources of fat that lead to the health benefits noted above.

However, though there is a clear benefit to eating unsaturated fats instead of saturated fats, both types continue to offer eaters the standard 9 calories per gram. As such, no eater should consume an excess amount of fat.

Equipped with the awareness and understanding that avoiding saturated fat is hazardous to health, and that there is such a thing as " good " (unsaturated) fat, it would be expected that most nutritional supplements on the market have created foods that reflect this understanding. This is, regrettably, not the case.

Most nutritional supplements contain some fat content; many even contain saturated fat for some inexplicable reason[2]. Tragically - and there is no other word - many dieters are deceived into eating self-described nutritionally intelligent foods that may be " low calorie " , and may even have some vitamins and nutrients, but they but they are adding to the individual's limited capacity to ingest fat grams. Many people who seek to lose weight by eating nutritional supplements often gain weight. They erroneously believe it is the result of a slow metabolism, when the culprit is the amount of fat grams ingested.

Fortunately, there are several fat-free food supplements on the market today. There are several important benefits of this strategy that benefit dieters of all sizes.

The obvious benefit is that a dieter does not have to count fat calories when eating these nutritional supplements; they are 100% fat free, and do not add to their daily fat-intake limit.

Less obviously, however, is that a zero-fat nutritional supplement that contains protein can stimulate the digestive system and minimize fat storage. This is because the protein content can help regulate the body's ability to effectively absorb the calories that it derives from carbohydrates and fats. For example, a dieter who eats a sugary, fat-filled cupcake can mitigate fat storage and increase nutrient utilization by eating it with a protein-rich nutritional supplement.

The world of nutrition has long since known the link between dietary fat and weight gain. Unsaturated fat can be a trusted ally in the fight against weight loss. Understanding how it differs from saturated fat helps demystify the stigma of unsaturated fats - a stigma that should be reserved for its unhealthy cousin, saturated fats.


[1] Fat cells can be removed externally, through such methods as liposuction and stapling, but these so-called solutions carry their own brand of risks and consequences.

[2] Actually, the reason is usually because of taste.

REFERENCES

[i] Source: " Fat Dictionary " . Dietsite.com.


http://www.dietsite.com/dt/diets/HeartHealthy/fatdictionary.asp#SATURATED%20FATS:

[ii] Source: " The Surgeon General's Call To Action To Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity " . US Department of Health and Human Services.


http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/topics/obesity/calltoaction/fact_adolescents.htm

[iii] Source: " Reducing Dietary Fat " . WebMD.


http://my.webmd.com/content/article/46/2731_1679

[iv] Source: " Can Diabetics Benefit from the Removal of Fat? " . Washington University Physicians.


http://wuphysicians.wustl.edu/newsArchive.asp?navID=1 & category=home & ID=288

[v] Source: " Weight Loss Understanding Why Diet's Don't Work - and what DOES Work " . Healthynewage.com.


http://www.healthynewage.com/losing-weight.htm

[vi] ibid.

About The Author

Copyright 2004 - Protica Research - www.protica.com

Founded in 2001, Protica, Inc. is a nutritional research firm with offices in Lafayette Hill and Conshohocken, Pennsylvania. Protica manufactures capsulized foods, including Profect, a compact, hypoallergenic, ready-to-drink protein beverage containing zero carbohydrates and zero fat. Information on Protica is available at http://www.protica.com

You can also learn about Profect at http://www.profect.com

Comments

Ped 14.04.2008. 18:19

Is trans fat more fattening than saturated fat? Is trans fat more fattening than saturated fat or are they as equally fattening?

Ped

Admin 14.04.2008. 18:19

Trans fat is much worse than saturated fat.
There are no redeeming qualities of trans fat!

Here is a simple and rough breakdown of the fats, and how much you need them on a scale of 1 to 10.
Trans = 0
Saturated = 3 (more like a 5 for building muscle)
Unsaturated (Poly and Mono) = 9

Your diet should consist of no less than 20% fat. I would try to keep it at 0% trans, 5% (up to 10% for muscle gain) saturated, and the leftover unsaturated. Testosterone comes from the cholesterol contained in saturated fat.

Admin

Turbanator 19.06.2012. 22:12

Last year i checked my BP it showed 130 mm Hg, this year i checked it showes 170 mm hg.What should i do? I have been getting very angry for small small things....and that anger turns out into a rage.
I suppose that has been one of the reason.
Lately have been having alcohol( like 3 quaters of vodka or whiskey with one or two strong beers in two weeks)
i have been eating junk food at times and sleeping late.
I have been exercising regularly though, and yes i am 194 cms tall and weigh 120 kgs.

Turbanator

Admin 19.06.2012. 22:12

15 tips for lowering your cholesterol naturally

Many factors contribute to the development of heart disease or stroke. Genes and gender play a role, but for most of us, what we eat is an important factor as well. The good news is that a few small changes to your diet can help lower your cholesterol, which in turn will lower your risk for heart disease and stroke. Here are 15 heart-healthy eating tips to help you in the fight against high cholesterol.

1. Eat meat sparingly. Relegate meat to a minor part of your diet instead of making it the centerpiece of most meals. Trim off fat and skin from meats and poultry. Avoid fatty cuts of beef, pork, and lamb; instead choose lean meats, or substitute fish or skinless white-meat poultry. When dining out, choose a smaller portion of meat, or meatless pasta or fish dishes.

2. Opt for low-fat dairy products. Avoid dairy foods that contain whole milk or cream; instead, use low-fat or nonfat versions.

3. Watch the snacks. Choose low-fat snacks (homemade popcorn, carrots, dried fruits, or fresh fruits) instead of high-fat ones (potato chips and candy bars). Avoid store-bought bakery products unless they are explicitly low in saturated fats and free of trans fats.

4. Cut down on saturated fat in cooking. Use liquid cooking oils rather than butter or margarine. Use nonstick pans. Instead of frying your food, bake, broil, roast, steam, or stew. Discard drippings, and baste with wine or broth.

5. Avoid palm and coconut oils. Most vegetable oils are unsaturated, but these two contain mostly saturated fat. Choose canola, sunflower, safflower, corn, soybean, olive, and peanut oils.

6. Reduce dietary cholesterol. Strive to eat less than 200 mg of dietary cholesterol a day. Limit eggs to no more than four egg yolks per week; two egg whites can replace a whole egg in most recipes. Limit lean meat, fish, and poultry to no more than 6 ounces per day (a 3-ounce portion is about the size of a deck of playing cards). Stay away from cholesterol-rich organ meats, such as liver, brains, and kidneys.

7. Increase complex carbohydrates and fiber. Emphasize foods with complex carbohydrates?such as fruits and vegetables, whole-grain products, and legumes (dried beans and peas)?that are low in calories and high in fiber. Eat more water-soluble fiber, such as that found in oat bran and fruits. This type of fiber can significantly lower your blood cholesterol level when eaten in conjunction with a low-fat diet.

8. Eat fruits and vegetables. To protect your heart, eat plenty of fruits and vegetables.

9. Go for nuts. Nuts are associated with a lower risk of heart disease. They?re a healthful and filling source of protein, but go easy on them; they have lots of calories, so too much could cause weight gain.

10. Add fish to your diet. Countries with high fish consumption have a lower risk of death from all causes as well as from cardiovascular disease. Like nuts, oily fish contain the essential fatty acids known as omega-3s and omega-6s. Since our bodies can?t make these, we have to eat foods that contain them to gain their benefits, which include improved cholesterol levels.

11. Reduce salt intake. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Diets high in salt increase risk of hypertension.

12. Avoid trans fats. According to the Institute of Medicine?s Food and Nutrition Board, there are no redeeming qualities to trans fats, and no safe levels. They raise LDL cholesterol and lower HDL cholesterol. The National Cholesterol Education Program urges people to eat as little as possible. Avoid or eat only very small quantities of foods that list hydrogenated oil or partially hydrogenated oil among their first ingredients. These products contain a lot of trans fat.

13. Drink alcohol only in moderation. Regular, moderate drinking can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, but heavy drinking negates the benefits. Moreover, the advantages aren?t strong enough to recommend alcohol for anyone who doesn?t already drink. For those who do, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend no more than one drink a day for women, and one or two drinks a day for men.

14. Read labels carefully. Avoid prepared foods that list any of the following among the first few ingredients: meat fat, coconut or palm oil, cream, butter, egg or yolk solids, whole milk solids, lard, cocoa butter, chocolate or imitation chocolate, or hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated fat or oil. Watch out for fast foods and other unlabeled products; when you don?t know what you?re getting, eat sparingly.

15. Change strategies. If three months of healthy eating doesn?t bring your total and LDL cholesterol levels into the desired range, consult your physician and a dietitian. If the numbers still don?t budge after six months, it may be time to consider medication.
good luck and God bless you

Admin

? 09.07.2012. 16:55

Please suggest me food for cholesterol problem? Which food is good and which to avoid? Following is my lipid profile

Serum Cholesterol - 134.5 mg/dl
Serum Triglyceride - 205.3 mg/dl (normal < 150) This is abnormal
HDL Cholesterol - 30.4 mg/dl (normal 35 - 60 mg/dl) This is abnormal
LDL Cholesterol - 86.1 mg/dl
S VLDL Cholesterol - 36.6 mg/dl (normal upto 35) This is abnormal
LDL/HDL cho. ratio - 2.8 : 1.0 (normal up to 3.5 : 1.0)
Total lipids - 596.3 mg/dl (normal 400 to 800)

I am 31 year old Indian female and already I was having primary hypothyroid, insulin resistant & obesity taking thyronorm 50 mcg & now started taking glycomet 500 (twice a day so total 1000) regulary. (glycomet is generic version of metformin). My doctor is telling that it is not appropriate to give cholesterol medicine right now as he says it will clash with thyroid medicine & suggested to reduce weight & modify food. He said if it comes to normal by diet & exercise then no medicine require else later will have to give medicine. My weight is 84 kg (185 lbs) & height is five feet.

- Which food helps in lowering cholesterol?
- Which has no bad effect on cholesterol and harmless if consumed?
- And which one is harmful and should be avoided?

?

Admin 09.07.2012. 16:55

avoid oil/meat/egg/fatty/dry fruits etc.
Many factors contribute to the development of heart disease or stroke. Genes and gender play a role, but for most of us, what we eat is an important factor as well. The good news is that a few small changes to your diet can help lower your cholesterol, which in turn will lower your risk for heart disease and stroke. Here are 15 heart-healthy eating tips to help you in the fight against high cholesterol.

1. Eat meat sparingly. Relegate meat to a minor part of your diet instead of making it the centerpiece of most meals. Trim off fat and skin from meats and poultry. Avoid fatty cuts of beef, pork, and lamb; instead choose lean meats, or substitute fish or skinless white-meat poultry. When dining out, choose a smaller portion of meat, or meatless pasta or fish dishes.

2. Opt for low-fat dairy products. Avoid dairy foods that contain whole milk or cream; instead, use low-fat or nonfat versions.

3. Watch the snacks. Choose low-fat snacks (homemade popcorn, carrots, dried fruits, or fresh fruits) instead of high-fat ones (potato chips and candy bars). Avoid store-bought bakery products unless they are explicitly low in saturated fats and free of trans fats.

4. Cut down on saturated fat in cooking. Use liquid cooking oils rather than butter or margarine. Use nonstick pans. Instead of frying your food, bake, broil, roast, steam, or stew. Discard drippings, and baste with wine or broth.

5. Avoid palm and coconut oils. Most vegetable oils are unsaturated, but these two contain mostly saturated fat. Choose canola, sunflower, safflower, corn, soybean, olive, and peanut oils.

6. Reduce dietary cholesterol. Strive to eat less than 200 mg of dietary cholesterol a day. Limit eggs to no more than four egg yolks per week; two egg whites can replace a whole egg in most recipes. Limit lean meat, fish, and poultry to no more than 6 ounces per day (a 3-ounce portion is about the size of a deck of playing cards). Stay away from cholesterol-rich organ meats, such as liver, brains, and kidneys.

7. Increase complex carbohydrates and fiber. Emphasize foods with complex carbohydrates?such as fruits and vegetables, whole-grain products, and legumes (dried beans and peas)?that are low in calories and high in fiber. Eat more water-soluble fiber, such as that found in oat bran and fruits. This type of fiber can significantly lower your blood cholesterol level when eaten in conjunction with a low-fat diet.

8. Eat fruits and vegetables. To protect your heart, eat plenty of fruits and vegetables.

9. Go for nuts. Nuts are associated with a lower risk of heart disease. They?re a healthful and filling source of protein, but go easy on them; they have lots of calories, so too much could cause weight gain.

10. Add fish to your diet. Countries with high fish consumption have a lower risk of death from all causes as well as from cardiovascular disease. Like nuts, oily fish contain the essential fatty acids known as omega-3s and omega-6s. Since our bodies can?t make these, we have to eat foods that contain them to gain their benefits, which include improved cholesterol levels.

11. Reduce salt intake. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Diets high in salt increase risk of hypertension.

12. Avoid trans fats. According to the Institute of Medicine?s Food and Nutrition Board, there are no redeeming qualities to trans fats, and no safe levels. They raise LDL cholesterol and lower HDL cholesterol. The National Cholesterol Education Program urges people to eat as little as possible. Avoid or eat only very small quantities of foods that list hydrogenated oil or partially hydrogenated oil among their first ingredients. These products contain a lot of trans fat.

13. Drink alcohol only in moderation. Regular, moderate drinking can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, but heavy drinking negates the benefits. Moreover, the advantages aren?t strong enough to recommend alcohol for anyone who doesn?t already drink. For those who do, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend no more than one drink a day for women, and one or two drinks a day for men.

14. Read labels carefully. Avoid prepared foods that list any of the following among the first few ingredients: meat fat, coconut or palm oil, cream, butter, egg or yolk solids, whole milk solids, lard, cocoa butter, chocolate or imitation chocolate, or hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated fat or oil. Watch out for fast foods and other unlabeled products; when you don?t know what you?re getting, eat sparingly.

15. Change strategies. If three months of healthy eating doesn?t bring your total and LDL cholesterol levels into the desired range, consult your physician and a dietitian. If the numbers still don?t budge after six months, it may be time to consider medication.

Admin

? 09.07.2012. 16:38

How to reduce cholesterol naturally without medicine? What happens if cholesterol is high? Following is my lipid profile

Lipid profile
Serum Cholesterol - 134.5 mg/dl
Serum Triglyceride - 205.3 mg/dl (normal < 150) This is abnormal
HDL Cholesterol - 30.4 mg/dl (normal 35 - 60 mg/dl) This is abnormal
LDL Cholesterol - 86.1 mg/dl
S VLDL Cholesterol - 36.6 mg/dl (normal upto 35) This is abnormal
LDL/HDL cho. ratio - 2.8 : 1.0 (normal up to 3.5 : 1.0)
Total lipids - 596.3 mg/dl (normal 400 to 800)

I am 31 year old Indian female and already I was having primary hypothyroid, insulin resistant & obesity taking thyronorm 50 mcg & now started taking glycomet 500 (twice a day so total 1000) regulary. (glycomet is generic version of metformin). My doctor is refusing to give cholesterol medicine right now as he says it will clash with thyroid medicine & suggested to reduce weight & oily food to bring cholesterol levels normal & said if it comes to normal by diet & exercise then no medicine require else will have to give medicine. My weight is 84 kg (185 lbs) & height is five feet. Is he right for not suggesting cholesterol & liver medicine. And will reducing weight help in making all those tests normal?

AND important question what disadvantage happens to body if cholesterol levels is high. I have water retention in feet and ankles sometimes especially when I don't sleep at night and keep working at computer is it associated with cholesterol. If I take good sleep then in morning I don't see swelling in legs but by evening little bit swelling come back.

?

Admin 09.07.2012. 16:38

15 tips for lowering your cholesterol naturally

Many factors contribute to the development of heart disease or stroke. Genes and gender play a role, but for most of us, what we eat is an important factor as well. The good news is that a few small changes to your diet can help lower your cholesterol, which in turn will lower your risk for heart disease and stroke. Here are 15 heart-healthy eating tips to help you in the fight against high cholesterol.

1. Eat meat sparingly. Relegate meat to a minor part of your diet instead of making it the centerpiece of most meals. Trim off fat and skin from meats and poultry. Avoid fatty cuts of beef, pork, and lamb; instead choose lean meats, or substitute fish or skinless white-meat poultry. When dining out, choose a smaller portion of meat, or meatless pasta or fish dishes.

2. Opt for low-fat dairy products. Avoid dairy foods that contain whole milk or cream; instead, use low-fat or nonfat versions.

3. Watch the snacks. Choose low-fat snacks (homemade popcorn, carrots, dried fruits, or fresh fruits) instead of high-fat ones (potato chips and candy bars). Avoid store-bought bakery products unless they are explicitly low in saturated fats and free of trans fats.

4. Cut down on saturated fat in cooking. Use liquid cooking oils rather than butter or margarine. Use nonstick pans. Instead of frying your food, bake, broil, roast, steam, or stew. Discard drippings, and baste with wine or broth.

5. Avoid palm and coconut oils. Most vegetable oils are unsaturated, but these two contain mostly saturated fat. Choose canola, sunflower, safflower, corn, soybean, olive, and peanut oils.

6. Reduce dietary cholesterol. Strive to eat less than 200 mg of dietary cholesterol a day. Limit eggs to no more than four egg yolks per week; two egg whites can replace a whole egg in most recipes. Limit lean meat, fish, and poultry to no more than 6 ounces per day (a 3-ounce portion is about the size of a deck of playing cards). Stay away from cholesterol-rich organ meats, such as liver, brains, and kidneys.

7. Increase complex carbohydrates and fiber. Emphasize foods with complex carbohydrates?such as fruits and vegetables, whole-grain products, and legumes (dried beans and peas)?that are low in calories and high in fiber. Eat more water-soluble fiber, such as that found in oat bran and fruits. This type of fiber can significantly lower your blood cholesterol level when eaten in conjunction with a low-fat diet.

8. Eat fruits and vegetables. To protect your heart, eat plenty of fruits and vegetables.

9. Go for nuts. Nuts are associated with a lower risk of heart disease. They?re a healthful and filling source of protein, but go easy on them; they have lots of calories, so too much could cause weight gain.

10. Add fish to your diet. Countries with high fish consumption have a lower risk of death from all causes as well as from cardiovascular disease. Like nuts, oily fish contain the essential fatty acids known as omega-3s and omega-6s. Since our bodies can?t make these, we have to eat foods that contain them to gain their benefits, which include improved cholesterol levels.

11. Reduce salt intake. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Diets high in salt increase risk of hypertension.

12. Avoid trans fats. According to the Institute of Medicine?s Food and Nutrition Board, there are no redeeming qualities to trans fats, and no safe levels. They raise LDL cholesterol and lower HDL cholesterol. The National Cholesterol Education Program urges people to eat as little as possible. Avoid or eat only very small quantities of foods that list hydrogenated oil or partially hydrogenated oil among their first ingredients. These products contain a lot of trans fat.

13. Drink alcohol only in moderation. Regular, moderate drinking can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, but heavy drinking negates the benefits. Moreover, the advantages aren?t strong enough to recommend alcohol for anyone who doesn?t already drink. For those who do, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend no more than one drink a day for women, and one or two drinks a day for men.

14. Read labels carefully. Avoid prepared foods that list any of the following among the first few ingredients: meat fat, coconut or palm oil, cream, butter, egg or yolk solids, whole milk solids, lard, cocoa butter, chocolate or imitation chocolate, or hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated fat or oil. Watch out for fast foods and other unlabeled products; when you don?t know what you?re getting, eat sparingly.

15. Change strategies. If three months of healthy eating doesn?t bring your total and LDL cholesterol levels into the desired range, consult your physician and a dietitian. If the numbers still don?t budge after six months, it may be time to consider medication.
good luck and God bless you

Admin

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