Five Great News Stories You're Sitting On Right Now

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Five Great News Stories You're Sitting On Right Now

By: George Hopkin

Smaller companies don't always have the budget - or inclination - to retain a PR hotshot to tell the world about their business success, but that doesn't mean they aren't a ready source of news.

The problem is it's often dull news which is ignored by all except the industry press and quite rightly so in most cases. If you land a contract, you issue a press release. If you take on a new senior sales rep, you issue a press release. Attending an exhibition? Press release, natch. These are simply announcements that you are doing what you do, that it's business as usual.

With a little lateral thinking, however, you could be issuing press releases throughout the year which present topics and subjects that'll have editors from all disciplines chasing you for the full story. Below I've presented just five brainstormers to get the creative juices flowing.

- Your Survey Says...

Even though I know nothing about your company, the odds are that you have the time and resources to carry out a survey which could get you some coverage if it's implemented and reported properly.

Concentrate on your niche, whether that's your industry or expertise. Keep it relatively simple, but ensure the final results have the potential to grab headlines. For example, if you're a butcher, you could ask 100 people if they would give up bacon if their partner issued an ultimatum. '4 Out of 10 Choose Bacon Over Marriage' is going to get an editor's attention!

But be honest about your methodology. If you've simply polled a handful of your colleagues, don't try to pass it off as a six-month research project.

Some journalists won't touch a survey story with a barge poll unless it's been carried out with the kind of planning that goes into a Nasa shuttle launch, but others might find it useful, particularly if it's a fun subject and doesn't take itself too seriously.

- Your Opinion Counts

Surf the major news sites - try Google News for starters:

http://news.google.com/nwshp?hl=en & gl=us

Ask yourself what you or your boss would have to say about the main news stories of the day. Or perhaps a current event impacts directly on your industry. Pretty soon you're going to have a story to tell.

A property solicitor in Scotland did this and the resulting story is great - here's the intro:

" Scottish property solicitor criticises Gordon Brown's tax U-turn.

A leading Scottish property solicitor has criticised Chancellor of the Exchequer Gordon Brown's decision to abolish without notice the exemption for deprived areas from Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT), saying that the measure would have an adverse impact upon the commercial property market in Scotland. "

Full story: http://www.clickpress.com/releases/Detailed/542005cp.shtml

- Your Opinion Counts 2 - Straight to the Editor's Desk

While serving as editor of business magazines in the past, there have been times when PR companies have contacted me following publication with some kind of gripe regarding coverage of their company or client.

Disgruntled PR people are often being beaten hard with large sticks by CEOs and senior management who just don't 'get media', so their persistence is somewhat understandable.

But 9.98 times out of 10 the PR exec is simply not going to get what they want - some kind of full-page, front-cover apology and glowing testimonial signed by the publisher himself printed with a photo of the editor's public execution.

Every time I let them down I did say: " Write in - we're always keen to receive letters to the editor. " I'd guess one in 20 actually went ahead and did so, but you know what? If every one of them wrote in I would almost certainly have printed them all. Good editors embrace transparency - if you disagree with them or their reporters they're likely to print your letter.

- Happy Birthday

At the very most you're 364 days away from some company milestone and if you put your mind to it you may find a few anniversaries just around the corner.

Don't limit yourself to the xx years since the company was launched, how about the anniversary of the company's first profit, a look back at the day the company took on its 10th employee, or the date a key contract was secured.

Then tell the tale of how your company has developed since this date. Be sure to include some drama, the good times and the bad, and plenty of meaty quotes from the most senior talking heads.

- Make a Date

Hunt for an angle based on some future date that is covered in one way or another by local and national press.

Browse some of these major online almanacs for inspiration:

What you're doing here is following the Happy Birthday strategy, but looking for external hooks on which to hang your news release.

Local newspapers in particular like to keep an eye on the calendar, so if you can provide your neighbourhood newspaper with a story, photo opportunity or news release and photo package related to a particular event, celebration or holiday, you could get some great quality local coverage.

- Only Five?

Trawl the internet for reasons to write a press release and you'll come up with dozens of lists. Some of them provide 30 plus reasons to issue a release, but the vast majority of them require you to have " done something " . They are reactive reasons, rather than proactive.

The reasons given above can be put into action today - you don't have to wait to secure a new contract or make a high-level appointment to get ink.

You might not have known you were sitting on those news stories, but there's no time like the present to tip off the press that you have them.

Copyright Copyright 2005 George Hopkin

About The Author

George Hopkin is a freelance journalist and CEO of ClickPress (http://www.clickpress.com), a free press release distribution service which distributes content to some of the world's most influential news and web search engines. ClickPress is a property of Pressventures, a provider of free and fee-based services to PR professionals.

You have permission to publish this article electronically or in print, free of charge, as long as the bylines are included. If it is to be delivered via email it must be to your own opt-in list only. A courtesy copy of your publication would be appreciated.

george@pressventures.com

Comments

TJW 26.09.2009. 07:29

I want to become a Navy SEAL sniper, any advice? hey, im 16 and my dream is to be in the Navy SEALs. this has been my dream since i was 10 and ive wanted to be a sniper in the military ever since i could remember. Im a great swimmer and very athletic. I plan on going to Annapolis, if not ill do NROTC. does anyone, preferably a Navy SEAL, have any advice on training and becoming a better shot?

TJW

Admin 26.09.2009. 07:29

The best shot is to try to get in as enlisted. There are several reasons for that.

(1) Most of those in the teams are enlisted.

(2) Officers only get one shot at it, while some enlisted are granted a chance to try again if they fail.

(3) There's a cap on the number of OCS and Annapolis graduates allowed to apply.

--------

Those that tell you that SEAL training is "torture" haven't been there... or didn't make it through. It's not easy. It's not supposed to be. It's purpose is to get rid of those who have any hint of "quitability" in their system. It's better for you to quit during training when the only think at risk is your self-esteem, than for you to wimp out in the field where it would jeopardize the mission and endanger the lives of your buddies.

Any requirements you see are minimum requirements. You're expected to exceed them. Guys who just meet them are competing with guys who exceed them by 20%. Who do you think they'll select for the teams. They expect 150% five days a week and 200% the next two... and then do it again the next week.

I used to swim with a SWCC/SEAL recruiter. He was training his son for SEAL. The kid I guess is about 14 now. But a year ago he'd run 500, swim 500, do 50 push-ups, 50 sit-ups, and 20 pull-ups in probably a little less than 30 minutes... and then he'd do it again.

I know a guy who runs (not jogging) 3-5 miles three or four days a week, swims a couple of miles a day, does weights three times a week, cardio another three days, works out with a kali instructor a couple days a week, his resting pulse is about 50... and he's almost 70.

Being SEAL isn't glamorous. You can't tell war stories because most of the stuff you do was never done... and it was in places nobody ever went. You can't tell your parents, your wife, your kids. I know guys who've been out since Vietnam, and they still don't talk about it. If you see a guy on here who says something like "10 years as a SEAL," he's faking it. The real thing doesn't advertise. Those who know, know. Those who don't... they don't care about.

If your name makes the news, more than likely you're dead.

The guys (enlisted and officers) only stay with it for about a dozen years -- on the average.

Admin

Jeremy D 21.08.2006. 14:14

I am teaching english for the first time, could someone please help me some sample lesson plans? Oh, I should mention that 13 year olds are the target.

If a teacher out there could email me some of the lesson plans that have worked reliably, that would be great.

Alternatively/In addition, if any kids could describe some good fun, inspiring, and informative lessons that would be great.

Also wondering if there are any teacher resource websites that might assist in this regard?

Thanks you so much, I am getting nervous!
To be honest, I'm not really that nervous, but the aim was to get as much help as possible.... and this is the best set of answers I have ever received, by the way.

Apprehensive might be the more appropriate word, but to me kids are just little adults (who aren't able to control some of their behaviour from time to time), so I should be fine as far as communication goes.

I just don't want to run the risk of having an unsuitable lesson and losing them first lesson!!!

Jeremy D

Admin 21.08.2006. 14:14

I had the best seventh grade English teacher. He taught us so much without us even realizing that we were learning anything. It was great.

The first class he taught us about perspective. He let us look around his classroom for a minute. Then, he told us to either stand on top of our chair, or sit down on the floor. He told us to look around the room now and think about how different the room looked from that angle. Then he went on to tell us about perspective and what it means.

We did a unit on mysteries. We read three Sherlock Holmes stories, two of Poe's Auguste Dupin stories, and saw two movies-- "Young Sherlock Holmes" and "Clue". We had to write four essay-- One on each of Poe's stories, one for Sherlock Holmes, and one for Clue. It was good practice for writing essays, and we learned a lot about the outline of a mystery. After this, we partnered up and wrote our own mysteries. The super-detective I created became a major character of mine in stories I wrote afterwords.

When we were learning about the outline of an essay, he brought in a tape of commercials, which he played for us. We had to point out the clincher, the introduction, the conclusion, and all those things in each commercial. We separated the good commercials from the bad ones, and then wrote our own commercials for a sports drink we made up.

When we were learning about elements of literature, he seperated us into five groups and each group had to research a certain element, and then teach the class about it in a fun, creative way.

After reading the book "Tangerine", we were separated into groups again and made newspapers that dealt with issues in the story. Each newspaper had a weather report, a few editorials, a first page news story, a sports page, and a comic or cartoon.

When we read "Treasure Island", we did something similar to the project we did with plot, except this time we were researching either treasure, modern pirates, historical pirates, or ships. My group researched treasure, and we finished our presentation with a game of Jeopardy, with a treasure map style board.

The class was everybody's favorite class, I think. Throughout the year, we had a few major projects that lasted a few weeks, but in between we just had short lessons, vocabulary quizzes, spelling tests, and notes on grammar.

He didn't do this with our class because we were the Honors class and he trusted us, but with the regular classes, he gave occasional "D.I.R.T." quizes-- surprise "Did I Read This" quizes with a few questions about the novel the class was reading.

He was asking me about an idea he had for a new unit for his next class-- He was going to do this whole unit on fairy tales and use that to teach the class about plot, and read a novel related to the topic as they did that.

By the age of 13, most kids like to read in different ways, so leave it up to the class if they want to read in class or not. Kids like me liked to read ahead a lot, so we preferred to read at home, but others had a lot of questions to ask, so they liked to sit and read in class.

Also, if a story you're reading is going to have scary parts, warn the class about it. A few friends of mine had nightmares about "Murder in the Rue Morgue" when we read the beginning, so after that, our teacher let them leave the room while he was reading the gorey parts.

Good luck! If you would like to know more about what my English teacher taught us, just email me. =)

Admin

Lindsay Morgan 17.08.2011. 04:01

Really stressed out right now please help? Im really stressed out because school starts next week and im just super nervous for it (not sure why) and im really upset that summer will be over :( any advice?

Lindsay Morgan

Admin 17.08.2011. 04:01

As I've said previously on another question

Just take a deep breath, chill out - sit on the floor and blend into your surroundings. Remember that you can make a lot out of the rest of summer (i'm going to a camp and a cruise for the last days of summer)

Don't watch the news, cop dramas, or medical drama on TV , the worst thing is to hear about bad things that happened. Avoid violent, negative music.

During the year, only do work that matters: There?s a difference between doing work, and doing work that really matters. Much of the time, we use up the few days we have on this earth with busy-work, stuff that doesn?t make much difference, and that?s sadly a waste of our lives.
Recently on Dumb Little Man, writer Ali Hale suggested you ask yourself, ?Will this matter in five years?? I think this is a great question. It helps you distinguish between trivial busy-work that will take up all of your time but not matter in a few years, and tasks and projects and goals with high impact that will make a difference, in your career, in your life, in the lives of others...

Go outside and enjoy the weather (if you live in nice weather). Take a walk down the street and admire nature. (i kno im sounding really hippie'ish but yeah..) dont waste time on your comp/tv too much. go have a 3day long sleepover with your best friends, go hang out everyday at a pool, the mall, a fro-yo place whatever - go to somewhre cool nearby, like if you have a lake near your house, you can go fishing, biking, etc.
Go camping with your family, rock climb, kayak: use your summer!

Start a Blog
Use a blog as a platform to share your passion with the world whether it?s cars, fashion, or even funny family stories. Many successful authors got a jumpstart to their career by blogging ? it?s one way to share your views that doesn?t require a resume and doesn?t have an age limit. While every blog will not be an instant success, if you blog consistently and in a dedicated fashion, it can be something to mention when applying for grad schools, internships, or jobs.

Volunteer
Find a cause you?re passionate about and put in the hours to make an impact. Not only will you be helping make a difference in the world, but spending time volunteering has never harmed anyone! Dedicating time to help a cause will show future employers and school that you give back to your community while making you feel good about yourself. Find a cause and program that you care about, like cancer foundations, environmental organizations, or even a mentoring program that lets you guide young kids.

Read Books
Make a list of classic novels and award-winning books that interest you. Not only will you be broadening your horizons, you'll increase your reading comprehension and expand your vocabulary ? all of which will come in handy when writing and taking standardized exams for grad schools. Ask a friend to join you in your quest to read so you can talk about the plot with someone, or start a book club. Consider picking tomes that have been adapted into films so you can reward yourself with a movie after finishing the book.

Yoga, Pilates, Spinning, Kick-boxing, Zumba
Get active! There?s no better time than the summer to work on your fitness. Borrow instructional DVDs from your library or queue one up in Netflix streaming to find a routine and activity that works for you. Apart from toning your body and looking great, the benefits of working out are endless. Recent studies have concluded that working out improves your memory, decreases stress, makes you more productive, and leaves you with more energy. How will it help you out in the future? Including fitness in your routine is a positive change that will lead to a healthier and longer life.

Learn to Cook
This summer, ditch the processed frozen meals and embrace a cookbook. In the adult world, knowing how to cook is a valuable asset since home cooked meals are cheaper and healthier. Use your summer to try out easy recipes and learn to cook meals and dishes that you like to eat. Convince your kitchen-savvy family and friends to teach you their best recipes.

Think about it, school can't be that bad. What's the worst that could happen...you getting bad grades? Grades are based upon yourself, look at life as a big picture.

Admin

Alex 01.07.2013. 20:46

The future of careers in aviation (pilots)? My dad having worked for Boeing for over 30 years, I think the interest in aviation has rubbed off on me because I am very interested in attending a flight school or an aeronautical university (like Embry-Riddle) in order to become a pilot; I would prefer not to join the Air Force or take a military route, however.

With UAVs being used in the military (and I believe I also heard news of plans for commercial planes to be automated), will the need for pilots begin to decrease over the next few decades, or is it still very much a viable career?

It would be great if I could hear about the different pathways to becoming a professional pilot and even some first-hand stories / career reviews & experiences, if anyone happens to actually be a pilot.
Any advice is greatly appreciated ? thanks!

Alex

Admin 01.07.2013. 20:46

In a nutshell, the career has become unattractive, the cost in time and money to get there has become very high, more than a doctor or lawyer, the odds of ever getting a great flying job have become very low, and the risk of losing your license permanently due to health or accident are pretty good. If something bad happens, you or your loved ones are likely to face many lawsuits based on any errors you made no matter how insignificant, bankrupting your family.

In the US, the cost to get your ATP license is over $200k in training, fees, room and board, various other expenses. It will take you over five years of training, then another five years flying small planes at poverty pay, then maybe (MAYBE!) you will get into a regional airline, which pays very little. We're talking less than you'd get working minimum wage 40-hour weeks, with some big expenses for you. There is no way you can pay off student loans and survive during that time, many graduates have to take other jobs that limit their progress toward an airline career and stretch that timeline out, just to service their debt. If you have a wealthy sponsor you can make it to the povery pay at a regional. One in ten who pursue a commercial flying career actually make it to getting a license, the rest are probably broke but happier.

Most flying jobs now are low-paying regional jobs, the major airlines only hire every ten years or so in big groups. Fifteen years ago there was a surge of hiring at the majors, and the average new hire was 40 years old with over fifteen years experience. If you want to fly for a major airline, you can hope to make that decision when you are middle-age with a lot of experience. You will return to poverty pay if you do get to the bottom of a major airline seniority list, starting over and broke, again.

Most airline pilots regret their career decision, and do not recommend it to young people. They do not suggest it to their children. The flying is very scripted, you are just following explicit instructions, then turning on the autopilot. The airlines have taken as much skill out of the process as possible, and the trend is to more automation. Cockpits are very closely monitored to make sure pilots comply with every rule, and if anything goes wrong investigators will always find something the pilots didn't comply with. If you are involved in an accident or incident, God help you, because the FAA, NTSB, and your airline won't, they will be looking to put the blame on you to protect themselves, and they are very good at it.

Layovers are in the cheapest hotels, often in industrial and/or dangerous places, and there is barely enough time to shower and eat. Long waits for hotel vans, long rides to hotels, then wait in line for your room. A day where you spend 15-hours in uniform on company property typically pays five hours flight pay, so your real payrate is actually 1/3 of the contractual rate. On international trips you might get closer to 1/2 your contract payrate. Pilots fly more on holidays and vacation season than other times, so expect to be sitting at airports and in hotels for more than half of those times.

Pilot pay is legendary, but it is only a legend now. Airline pilot compensation is less than 1/4 of what it was in the '70s, adjusted for inflation, and the job is much more stressful and zero glamor. Lifetime earnings equate to a two-year trade-school career.

You will spend much of your career on-call, so you need to live within an hour or two of a major airport which you might not get to choose, that can be expensive. You may be moved to another base sometimes, and will need to get a "crashpad" there, many pilots spend most of their career using a crashpad. Crashpads are often apartments shared by a dozen pilots, or a trailer, some pilots even sleep in their cars or on a couch at the airport and shower at a gym.

Yes there is a shortage of pilots coming, but it won't improve the career, it will only force the governments to lower training and experience standards, reducing the value of pilots further. You can see the same thing has happened in the medical industry in response to their shortage, where low-paid nurses assistants do work doctors used to do.

Research this some more, you need to look carefully before you leap. I'll leave a few articles for you to read.

Admin

Fatima 13.04.2011. 18:51

how do i get my baby to sit still? so i took my baby to a photoshoot today but she didnt sit down at all!!! she kept on getting up and touching the objects around her at the studio so we decided to take her tomorrow instead. Shes 18month girl btw.

Fatima

Admin 13.04.2011. 18:51

Babies are an active bunch. And because they have lots of energy to burn, many of them are just like your little one, unable to sit in one place for long. That's why traditionally doctors reassure parents not to worry about hyperactivity at this age, and have rarely diagnosed children under the age of 5 with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Recently, however, a spate of news articles and research studies has shown that more children this age are being diagnosed with ADHD and prescribed medications such as Ritalin and Prozac to help them cope. But most experts continue to believe that it's a mistake to prescribe medication for toddlers and preschoolers, especially as the side effects of these medications haven't been well studied in young children.

If your baby's activity level is causing you concern, you may want to speak with your doctor about it. But the most important thing you can do is help her find as many outlets as possible for her abundant energy. Schedule frequent visits to the playground so she can run and climb to her heart's content. If you're indoors, turn on the radio or pop in a CD and get her dancing. You may want to join in the fray yourself (dancing, after all, increases the heart rate and keeps limbs loose, a plus for both adults and children). And if you can't play with your child ? for instance, when you're cooking dinner ? give her something to do instead of expecting her to sit quietly and wait for you. Loan her a few pots and pans and encourage her to use her toys as "ingredients" for a meal she cooks alongside you. The blocks can be mushrooms, and the puzzle pieces can be meat. Sing a song together as you cook, or catch up on your respective days.

You can help interest your child in sustained quiet activities by introducing them selectively and letting her participate at her own level. For example, if she doesn't seem to enjoy sitting on your lap to listen to a story, let her sit on the floor or wander around the room. If you add a lot of enthusiasm to your reading ? funny voices and animal sounds are big attention-getters ? she'll be hooked and will pay more attention.

Rhythm is a great outlet; if you can stand the noise, encourage her to pound on drums or shake a pair of maracas. Musical instruments help focus her energy on one activity, while allowing her to play vigorously and work out her emotions. And remember, your child is more likely to play with her toys if you play with her. If she's under 2, she'll rarely play for long on her own.

Finally, limit the amount of time you ask her to sit still. If it's important to you that she sit still at dinnertime, then get her involved in something physical before dinner so she'll be ready for some quiet time. And if five minutes is her limit for staying in her chair, praise her for her good mealtime behavior and let her go.

Admin

My two beautiful girls 05.01.2010. 04:53

describe verbal skills in effective communication? how do i describe the above?

My two beautiful girls

Admin 05.01.2010. 04:53

Hi Ava,

Effective verbal skills allow us to communicate with others in an unambiguous way. The people that we communicate with do not have to engage in mental gymnastics trying to decipher our messages.

What follows, is what I discovered when I typed 'Verbal Skills' using the Google Search Engine. You might care to do that because there is a great deal of information about the subject of Verbal Skills.

"Effective verbal communication is particularly important when building relationships with clients, customers and the media. A stimulating conversation or well-told story may be the most interesting part of a meeting, presentation or media interview. Even witty small talk with a potential client can evolve into a new business deal or project. Here is a few conversation pointers and verbal communication skills to keep in mind when meeting or networking."

1. A good business introduction includes your first and last name and the name of your company.

2. Always introduce yourself to those sitting next to you at a business dinner. If possible, meet everyone at your table before you sit down. Sit next to someone you don't know rather than someone you do know.

3. When introducing your guest or another person at a function, mention both first and last names and perhaps an interesting item of information about that person.

4. Before going to an event, business or social, be prepared to discuss items of current interest including books, films, television shows, or current events.

5. You can find your next conversation starter by reading at least one daily newspaper, weekly news magazine, or watching a morning news show.

6. Take the time to get to know others first. People don't care about you and what you do until they know you care about them. Build relationships and trust first.

7. Beware of being a pushy promoter. We?re often so passionate and excited about our business or latest project that we talk too much and oversell ourselves.

8. Listen closely and think before you speak. Don't interrupt, let the other person finish their thought before you give your opinion. Learn to do 80 percent of the listening and just 20 percent of the talking.

9. Listen attentively, smile and make good eye contact.

10. Practise the five words that help create and maintain small talk conversation by forming open-ended questions.The five words are: Who, What, When, Where and Why .
End of Google search.

From my own experience, the ability to be able to 'articulate ones worth' is crucial during a 'Job Interview'. The employer wants to make the perfect hire and you want to convince him/her that you are that person.

If the interviewer has to do radical surgery to extract information about you, that you should be freely telling him/her, then you are not having a good interview.

Just think of the many situations where it is important that you communicate effectively in your own life and that will provide you with an additional insight into the importance of good communication. These can relate to communicating with:
Parents, Teachers, Doctors, Medical Emergencies, Fire Department, Police, friends and relatives.

I hope this helps you with your project.

Admin

Kryssie 19.11.2009. 14:53

When is Midnight Sun Coming Out? I really want to read midnight sun! does anyone have any new news about the release? or is it the same thing. she's not sure she's gonna release it. thats all i've heard. i read the rough draft on her website. im just reallt wanting to read the rest of it.

Kryssie

Admin 19.11.2009. 14:53

She released a statement just a few days ago (11/16) on HER site regarding the status of MS. Apparently, she is eventually going to finish it, but doesn't have any idea when that will be because of various factors and said that she was only mad about the leak for a few weeks, then was over it.



FROM HER SITE:

To address the many, many questions about Midnight Sun:
I've found that there really isn't any answer I can give that changes the substance or tenor of the myriads of requests, pleadings, and demands I get for Midnight Sun to be finished, so I feel a little silly answering that question at all. But it's the most popular question, so I'll take another stab at it.
I am not working on Midnight Sun now. I don't have a plan for when I'll get to it; I don't know now what the right time for it will be.
In your questions, there were some erroneous conclusions about the situation which I'll try to set straight. First, Midnight Sun is not finished and locked in a safe, waiting for me to be done angsting over the leak. If it were done, I would be throwing it on the bookstore shelves myself. I'd love to be able to give it to all the people who are anxiously waiting for it. Second, I am not upset about the leak. I haven't been for a long time; I was over it after about three weeks. Third, and most important, I am not trying to punish anyone. Not the persons who leaked it, not the people who read the leak, nobody. As I said, it would make me very happy to be able to give it to anyone who wants it.
So why the hold up? Because it's not finished and lying in a safe. It's not done, and finishing it is not a simple matter of sitting down in front of my computer and typing out the words; the words have to be there in my head to type out, and right now, they're not. I have to be in the zone to write any story, and trying to force myself into that zone is a waste of time, I've found. I'll get back to Midnight Sun when the story is compelling to me again. Just because people want it so badly does not make it more write-able; kind of the opposite, actually. I need to be alone with a story to write, and Midnight Sun feels really crowded, if you know what I mean.
People write for different reasons. I have always written to make myself happy. If I'm enjoying a story, feeling the creativity flow, engrossed in a world, then I write and I write fast. If I'm not into it, I can't write. I've never been someone who writes on demand and I can't imagine working that way. As cool as it would be to say to my favorite author, "You know, I'd really like to read a great book about a narwhal mafia. Write that for me, 'kay?" or even "I'd love a sequel to that last one," that's not how it works. How it works is that my favorite author writes a new book about whatever he/she is interested in. Maybe it takes a year, maybe it takes five. If it's something I want to read, I buy it or I check it out at the library. If not, I find something else to read. The end.
(All of this goes for writing about vampires in general, too. Vampires and I? We're on a break.)
I'm pretty sure this won't slow the pleadings and the demands, but I didn't want you to think I was ignoring the question.
In the meantime, there are so many great books out there. I've got some recommendations on my site, and any librarian would love to show you more options. Same goes for independent bookstore employees. Ask for guidance, and they will fill your arms with awesomeness!

Admin

Bonnie 02.01.2008. 15:31

Would you listen to these people ? http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/cornwall/7166713.stm

I have a great respect for old people and all they can teach.
I would love to sit with these ladies for an afternoon and listen to all the stories they must be able to tell about the past. I love history.
Would you listen?
Great teachers or boring old trouts , what do you think. ?

Bonnie

Admin 02.01.2008. 15:31

I work with the elderly. I never cease to be amazed at the stories they tell.
About how they brought up their kids and the conditions they lived in make our houses seem like mansions.
three to a bed and sometimes two beds to a room. they had big families and everybody had their own chores to do.
The men are so interesting too. with their stories about their jobs and the war.
They tell you what they got up to as children and all the scrapes they got into.
There was so much more respect for your parents in those days. You were asked to do something...you just did it.

And their senses of humour are brilliant. eg. one day we put on a cd of Scots music for them, and the song "donald where's your troosers" came on. So they were singing with us and we changed the words for one woman who just takes such a laugh and sang "winnie where's your knickers"
She thought this was hilarious

Some of them have bad dementia and can't remember how to use a knife and fork, or simple instructions like "sit over here for your supper" but ask anything about when they were wee and they'll tell you

our old people are great. youngsters should take more time to be with them and learn.
they brought their mums and dads up and should be respected.

and of course you get the horrible ones that think young people are terrible but they are usually the ones who just want to moan about anything anyway.

The Old Woman's Poem
What are you thinking when you look at me?

A crabbit old woman, not very wise?

Uncertain of habit with faraway eyes?

Who dribbles her food and makes no reply?

When you say in a loud voice, "I wish you'd try."

Who seems not to notice the things that you do,

Who forever is losing a sock or a shoe.

Who unresisting or not, lets you do as you will,

With bathing and feeding, the long day to fill.

Is that what you're thinking, is that what you see?

Then open your eyes, you're not looking at me.

I'll tell who I am as I sit here so still,

As I move at your bidding and eat at your will.

I'm a small child of ten, with a father and mother,

Brothers and sisters who love one another.

A young girl at sixteen with wings on her feet,

Dreaming that soon now a lover she'll meet.

A bride soon at twenty, my heart gives a leap,

Remembering the vows that I promised to keep.

At twenty five now, I have young of my own,

Who need me to build a secure happy home.

A woman of thirty my young now grow fast,

Bound to each other with ties that should last.

At forty my young now soon will be gone,

But my man stays beside me to see I don't mourn.

At fifty once more babies play round my knee,

Again we know children, my loved one and me.

Dark days are upon me, my husband is dead,

I look at the future, I shudder with dread.

My young are all busy rearing young of their own,

I think of the years and the love I have known.

I'm an old woman now, and nature is cruel,

'Tis her jest to make our old age look the fool.

The body it crumbles, grace and vigor depart,

There is now a stone where I once had a heart.

But inside this old carcass a young girl still dwells,

And now and again my battered heart swells.

I remember the joys, I remember the pain,

And I'm loving and living life over again,

I think of the years all too few, gone so fast,

And accept the stark fact that nothing can last.

So open your eyes, nurse, open and see,

Not a crabbit old woman, look closer - SEE ME!

This poem was written by an old lady in a nursing home.

Admin

Jimmy Whispers V 06.03.2010. 23:04

Is Ahmadinejadnly the only person with some sense in this world? http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100306/ap_on_re_mi_ea/ml_iran

Jimmy Whispers V

Admin 06.03.2010. 23:04

From your link it would appear that you agree with Ahmadinejad that 911 was a US government hoax to allow George Bush to go to war.....

We will skip by the FACTS that prove that theory is ridicules and physically impossible and just look at the logic.

FIRST The more people involved in a "secret" the more difficult it is to keep it a secret..... a conspiracy of this size would take hundreds if not thousands of people to pull off. We have had criminal conspiracies involving as few as five people that we could not keep secret (Green Beret Murder Case).... because the people involved could not keep their mouth shut......or were conscious stricken..... or wanted to sell their book and make money..... ??? Yet not one "insider" of this huge conspiracy has come forward.... not one of the hundreds of conspirators has broken their "silence".....Nobody has gone to the National Inquirer and sold the "inside story" and retired to a Caribbean isle ???? No one has felt guilty about killing thousands of men,women and children ; cut a deal with the courts and gone into witness protection..... SILENCE .... that is just not consistent with history or logic.....

SECOND There is only two possible ways this could have been done.....A complete hoax with remote control fake aircraft.... or knowing in advance there was going to be an attack and not only letting it happen, but enhancing the destruction....
FAKE AIRCRAFT.... Impossible..... the REAL commercial airliners and the REAL passengers are still missing.....that is around 300 people someone would either need to cold bloodily murder..... or they ALL would need to start new lives.... leave friends , wives and family behind and start a new life somewhere else ..... not logical and impossible to keep secret
REAL TERRORIST ATTACK The big question here is WHY..... Why not halt the attack and be a hero.... you still have an excuse for war and you enter the history books as the President that saved America....a win ; win....??? Maybe President Bush was afraid the people still would not support a war on terrorism???... OK then just let the terrorist complete their attack ...WHY get involved?.... WHY was it necessary that the twin towers fall?.... The mere fact that the planes hit the towers and the Pentagon was enough to justify a war on terrorism.... there is not need to risk being discovered as the greatest mass murderer in the history of America..... just does not make logical sense.....

WTC 7...... Conspiracy theorists claim the building was blown down..... their proof is how it looked when it fell..... they totally ignore the FACT there is no report of an explosion capable of dropping the building.....No recording of such an explosion (Fire Departments and Police departments routinely record these disasters)...... so the explosion must have been "silent".... impossible
Beyond that ..... you are not allowed to smoke a cigarette around explosives..... yet these highly inflammable explosives survived in a raging inferno to HOT for firemen to remain in the building.... FOR TWO HOURS..... Why did you not blow the building down with your silent explosives the first half hour.....or the second??? Why risk burning all those hundreds of pounds of secret explosives??? ....and let them sit in a burning building for two hours >>>> illogical

Why risk dropping WTC 7 at all?.... why risk discovery?..... the towers were plenty of reason to go to war..... why risk blowing down a building nobody cares or ever heard of....???

Conspiracy theorist like to point to the insurance money..... change the motivation..... they ignore the FACT that the buildings earned money for the owners.... If you are getting milk from the cow every month; why butcher the cow for milk..... the next month you get NOTHING
It is illogical ......

and FINALLY.....Osama has confessed on video to bombing the towers....Osama's officers have confessed Osama was over joyed with the results....

There are no unanswered questions..... I threw this challenge out there before....had two takers.... both ran and hid after I proved the wrong.... I am and engineer....an experienced fire fighter....I fought aircraft fires.... I have blown down building.... THERE IS NO CONSPIRACY.....NO MYSTERY

To answer your question.... Ahmadinejad has no sense..... he said America never released the names of the 3,000 Americans who died on 911.....just days after America read each name allowed on TV...... he is an ignorant fanatic

Admin

Nataly N 07.12.2009. 12:39

Are there any recent news on "Midnight Sun" by Stephanie Meyer? Array

Nataly N

Admin 07.12.2009. 12:39

She updated her site on 11/16/09 regarding the status of MS and basically stated that eventually she will finsih it, but she doesn't know when.

From the home page of StephenieMeyer.com:
To address the many, many questions about Midnight Sun:

I've found that there really isn't any answer I can give that changes the substance or tenor of the myriads of requests, pleadings, and demands I get for Midnight Sun to be finished, so I feel a little silly answering that question at all. But it's the most popular question, so I'll take another stab at it.

I am not working on Midnight Sun now. I don't have a plan for when I'll get to it; I don't know now what the right time for it will be.

In your questions, there were some erroneous conclusions about the situation which I'll try to set straight. First, Midnight Sun is not finished and locked in a safe, waiting for me to be done angsting over the leak. If it were done, I would be throwing it on the bookstore shelves myself. I'd love to be able to give it to all the people who are anxiously waiting for it. Second, I am not upset about the leak. I haven't been for a long time; I was over it after about three weeks. Third, and most important, I am not trying to punish anyone. Not the persons who leaked it, not the people who read the leak, nobody. As I said, it would make me very happy to be able to give it to anyone who wants it.

So why the hold up? Because it's not finished and lying in a safe. It's not done, and finishing it is not a simple matter of sitting down in front of my computer and typing out the words; the words have to be there in my head to type out, and right now, they're not. I have to be in the zone to write any story, and trying to force myself into that zone is a waste of time, I've found. I'll get back to Midnight Sun when the story is compelling to me again. Just because people want it so badly does not make it more write-able; kind of the opposite, actually. I need to be alone with a story to write, and Midnight Sun feels really crowded, if you know what I mean.

People write for different reasons. I have always written to make myself happy. If I'm enjoying a story, feeling the creativity flow, engrossed in a world, then I write and I write fast. If I'm not into it, I can't write. I've never been someone who writes on demand and I can't imagine working that way. As cool as it would be to say to my favorite author, "You know, I'd really like to read a great book about a narwhal mafia. Write that for me, 'kay?" or even "I'd love a sequel to that last one," that's not how it works. How it works is that my favorite author writes a new book about whatever he/she is interested in. Maybe it takes a year, maybe it takes five. If it's something I want to read, I buy it or I check it out at the library. If not, I find something else to read. The end.

(All of this goes for writing about vampires in general, too. Vampires and I? We're on a break.)

I'm pretty sure this won't slow the pleadings and the demands, but I didn't want you to think I was ignoring the question.

Admin

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